Bicycle ERA |OT| This Is Why

Got dropped on a descent on tonight’s group ride. It wasn’t even a technical descent, pretty much straight down with two long curves.

Not even mad, just surprised because I’m the one normally ahead on the descents, it was humbling experience to say the least.
 
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So what am I looking at here? Is this going to be the ultimate commuter?
It's going to be the ultimate-esque non-compact diamond-frame TIG-welded derailleur-geared endurance most-road sport-touring safety bicycle.

Got dropped on a descent on tonight’s group ride. It wasn’t even a technical descent, pretty much straight down with two long curves.

Not even mad, just surprised because I’m the one normally ahead on the descents, it was humbling experience to say the least.
Are you normally ahead on descents because you're a good descender, or because you're enthusiastic about pulling on descents?
 
Both and also because some people are scared of descents. Last nights group wasn’t and they dropped me like a rock, I caught up to them later tho.
The only time descents begin to bug me out is when they're 10% or more grade in under 50 yards. THAT is freaky as hell because your speed just rockets. I don't mind long winding descents
 
Hello my cycling pals. I just sold my road Giant before completing my move to Germany. Once I arrive (next month), I'll be in the market for a bike. I had my attention set on the Focus Izalco Race with Sora, a groupset I find to be more than enough for my needs. The Izalco Race has apparently a very high grade frame, which turns out to be the same as the frame on the Focus Cayo, aka last year's model. Both of these bikes are under 1300 EUR, but I'd like to get something even cheaper if possible.

I was looking online at Fahrrad XXL, but I was wondering if you knew any other stores that are either in Germany or that ship to Germany. Looking for some sweet deals, of course. I'll be in NRW (Bochum), in case you have any tips about physical shops.
 
Hello my cycling pals. I just sold my road Giant before completing my move to Germany. Once I arrive (next month), I'll be in the market for a bike. I had my attention set on the Focus Izalco Race with Sora, a groupset I find to be more than enough for my needs. The Izalco Race has apparently a very high grade frame, which turns out to be the same as the frame on the Focus Cayo, aka last year's model. Both of these bikes are under 1300 EUR, but I'd like to get something even cheaper if possible.

I was looking online at Fahrrad XXL, but I was wondering if you knew any other stores that are either in Germany or that ship to Germany. Looking for some sweet deals, of course. I'll be in NRW (Bochum), in case you have any tips about physical shops.
Canyon now has their end of season sale.
You can get an aluminium Endurace with ultegra groupset for €1200 or a tiagra groupset for €900.
Might be worth the consideration.

The only time descents begin to bug me out is when they're 10% or more grade in under 50 yards. THAT is freaky as hell because your speed just rockets. I don't mind long winding descents
I did a climb in Gran Canaria that had parts with 30-35% inclines.
Going down that again was insane. Don’t know if my butt or brakes were clenching harder.
 
Just finishing my first week commuting in to the office on my Brompton. Nothing like you guys with your 100km rides but was a big step for me, especially with traffic in London, and I haven't ridden a bike in years.

Surprisingly the traffic has been mostly well behaved. I assume central london traffic is used to bikes, and the number of bikes on the road means they can't be ignored. You get one or two trying to overtake when it isn't appropriate, but I'm getting used to taking the middle of the lane when needed. And with the special section at traffic lights that lets you filter to the front of the queue, you're often at the next lights before vehicles can think about overtaking.

So far so good. I do need to sort out cold/wet weather gear - I'm just cyling in my work clothes at the moment and its still warm enough to not need a jacket. but it was a bright and chilly morning today so I need to get something quickly. Gloves and something to keep the wind out but not too warm
 
Just finishing my first week commuting in to the office on my Brompton. Nothing like you guys with your 100km rides but was a big step for me, especially with traffic in London, and I haven't ridden a bike in years.

Surprisingly the traffic has been mostly well behaved. I assume central london traffic is used to bikes, and the number of bikes on the road means they can't be ignored. You get one or two trying to overtake when it isn't appropriate, but I'm getting used to taking the middle of the lane when needed. And with the special section at traffic lights that lets you filter to the front of the queue, you're often at the next lights before vehicles can think about overtaking.

So far so good. I do need to sort out cold/wet weather gear - I'm just cyling in my work clothes at the moment and its still warm enough to not need a jacket. but it was a bright and chilly morning today so I need to get something quickly. Gloves and something to keep the wind out but not too warm
Great job! I’m happy to hear it’s been a positive experience. I agree that city drivers are much more contentious of cyclists than in the countryside.

For winter, it’s very important to keep your extremities covered. Your core will warm up pretty quickly so a heavy coat isn’t needed but your body will thank you for putting on gloves, and a hat and scarf
 
Great job! I’m happy to hear it’s been a positive experience. I agree that city drivers are much more contentious of cyclists than in the countryside.

For winter, it’s very important to keep your extremities covered. Your core will warm up pretty quickly so a heavy coat isn’t needed but your body will thank you for putting on gloves, and a hat and scarf
have regular gloves, but see lots of fingerless mitts in bike shops - is that more for long distance riding? Seems like it'd be handy for brake control and then maybe full finger if it gets really cold?
 
have regular gloves, but see lots of fingerless mitts in bike shops - is that more for long distance riding? Seems like it'd be handy for brake control and then maybe full finger if it gets really cold?
The fingerless gloves are padded on the palm to help with hand pain when riding long distances.

If it gets cold, your fingertips are going to freeze with all that cold wind being blasted on them. So full gloves would be better.

There are winter cycling gloves with the palm padding so look into those. I got mine at Decathlon for a good price.
 
have regular gloves, but see lots of fingerless mitts in bike shops - is that more for long distance riding? Seems like it'd be handy for brake control and then maybe full finger if it gets really cold?
Fingerless gloves provide no more control than full-finger gloves, unless the fingers on the full-finger gloves are thickly insulated, in which case you're likely riding in circumstances where a fingerless glove would be a bad idea anyway.

The main purposes of gloves for road riding are providing grip, mild road rash protection, and being fashionable.

Some gloves, fingerless or otherwise, are padded at the palms.
I would personally recommend against buying gloves with significant padding unless you have a specific reason to use glove padding; some people find them to be less comfortable than unpadded or bare hands, and they can even cause numbness by compressing soft tissues in the palm.
 
so just simple unpadded gloves, thin enough to provide good feel, just to help keep off wind chill. if its cold enough to need thicker gloves I would be more worried about ice on the road anyway
 
On the glove topic: a pair of Pearl Izumi fingerless gloves saved my hands from serious road rash after a crash I had. Palms were on the asphalt, and the gloves did what they were supposed to.

Nowadays I don't wear gloves, however. They can make my hands numb.
Canyon now has their end of season sale.
You can get an aluminium Endurace with ultegra groupset for €1200 or a tiagra groupset for €900.
Might be worth the consideration.



I did a climb in Gran Canaria that had parts with 30-35% inclines.
Going down that again was insane. Don’t know if my butt or brakes were clenching harder.
Only thing I'm not too sure about Canyon is I can't try them out. I'm 172cm, so according to their website I'd be XS/S. Would rather try the frame before buying
 
Only thing I'm not too sure about Canyon is I can't try them out. I'm 172cm, so according to their website I'd be XS/S. Would rather try the frame before buying
Have you used the detailed bike sizing guide on their website? https://www.canyon.com/en-gb/tools/pps/

It's also worth dropping them an email if you think you're between sizes as they can sometimes swap out a component or two - such as putting a longer stem on a smaller frame.
 
HEY Y'ALL!

So I have been reading up a lot on cycling recently, and I really miss riding when I was in high school and such. I've decided I want to start riding again and I wanna get a new (or maybe used!) bike. Thing is, I've gained a tiiiiiiny bit of weight since high school. Like, just a smidge. As in, I weight about 320 now. and weighed about 220 then. ;) I've been reassured by folks at my local bike shop that my weight won't be an issue for most bike shop level of bikes, if that makes sense (although finding appropriate clothing for longer rides may be slightly more difficult). Meaning, so long as I don't get some $90 bike off Amazon I should be just fine, although I may have somewhat higher maintenance checks to do.

Anyway, I wanna start biking again because not only is it fun, but I figure I could lose some weight, too. I tore my ACL when I was in high school, so walking/jogging more than a mile or so makes things pretty uncomfortable. I would mainly be biking on paved roads/paths (actually, pretty much exclusively that terrain. I don't see me doing true off road biking), and would be doing mostly short rides for a while to get into the swing of things, but with the goal of commuting once or twice a week to work, which is about eight miles away from home, most of which is on roads that have a bike lane, or on paved bike paths.

I have a friend who has been cycling for years and has been helping me out quite a bit. I figured I would just get some more opinions to make sure I'm getting a nice wide set of options to research and try out before I make a purchase.

Thus far, I've looked mainly at Marin and Fuji bikes (although that's only because that's what my local bike shop sells for the most part). After discussing things with my friend and with the folks in the bike shop, we felt like a true road bike wouldn't be the best fit for me, at least for right now. This is mainly because they aren't usually the most comfortable rides for new riders, and because I'm not exactly the best build for one of these types. We have discussed that the best fit would likely be either a comfort/hybrid bike, or a mountain bike.

I really liked the look of the Marin Stinson and Fairfax. They are reasonable priced and seem to hit everything I need. My only concerns on the Stinson are the drivetrain (it apparently has a cheaper one than the Fairfax), and the way that the Stinson has the rider sit is much more upright, which unfortunately makes things less efficient, even if it is more comfortable overall. Both are similarly priced as well, so moving to the Fairfax off of the Stinson is totally reasonable for me. I also liked the Marin Lockspur, for similar reasons.

The shop also has a used Raleigh Redux for sale at $325. It is in fine shape, and was really not very used. Apparently the rider bought it, never rode it, and traded it in towards a child's bike for his son about a year after purchase. I'll admit I don't know a lot about this particular bike but it seemed like a good mix of mountain and comfort bike. My biggest concern is that the lifetime warranty on the frame, as well as limited warranties on other parts will not carry over to me, since it is used. Also, it is a true 8 speed bike, so it may not be as efficient for climbing hills. I'm not gonna be cycling up Mt. Everest or anything, but my ride to work certainly will not be a flat one.

Any thoughts on these models, or any suggestions on others that I should maybe take a look at? Any other suggestions for clothing, or things to look out for? Accessory recommendations (lights, phone holders, etc)?

Thanks for any info you provide, folks, and sorry for such a long post!

tl;dr: Fat guy looking to get back into cycling to and from work on a 7-8 mile ride, looking for bike suggestions and any other info you may have.
 
Hello my cycling pals. I just sold my road Giant before completing my move to Germany. Once I arrive (next month), I'll be in the market for a bike. I had my attention set on the Focus Izalco Race with Sora, a groupset I find to be more than enough for my needs. The Izalco Race has apparently a very high grade frame, which turns out to be the same as the frame on the Focus Cayo, aka last year's model. Both of these bikes are under 1300 EUR, but I'd like to get something even cheaper if possible.

I was looking online at Fahrrad XXL, but I was wondering if you knew any other stores that are either in Germany or that ship to Germany. Looking for some sweet deals, of course. I'll be in NRW (Bochum), in case you have any tips about physical shops.
Any reason you're looking at the carbon framed version? You'll save €500 going to the aluminum version
 
Fingerless gloves provide no more control than full-finger gloves, unless the fingers on the full-finger gloves are thickly insulated, in which case you're likely riding in circumstances where a fingerless glove would be a bad idea anyway.

The main purposes of gloves for road riding are providing grip, mild road rash protection, and being fashionable.

Some gloves, fingerless or otherwise, are padded at the palms.
I would personally recommend against buying gloves with significant padding unless you have a specific reason to use glove padding; some people find them to be less comfortable than unpadded or bare hands, and they can even cause numbness by compressing soft tissues in the palm.
I’ve gone fully gloveless on road bikes. I only wear full fingers when it’s low 50s
 
Any reason you're looking at the carbon framed version? You'll save €500 going to the aluminum version
I was mostly looking for carbon frames because I saw some deals on the BMC Teammachine SL03 with carbon frame and Sora (899EUR) and some other very cool bikes with Di2 ready carbon frames like the Focus Izalco Race Sora (1100 EUR), so it got my cycling shorts wet and I started dreaming about the most marketable material atm
 
Got my first KOM today.

Nothing to rave about, just a small hill in my neighborhood park, but I’m glad I have at least one.
Gz! We don’t have any climbs here worth mentioning as KOMs but I have some sprint KOMs I’m proud to have.

Also: the monthly update
About a 100k more? So I’m happy :)

 
Gravel has longer wheelbase, and more relaxed angles on the headset. Cyclocross is a racier bike.

Basically gravel is an endurance cyclocross.
This is a good ELI5
I’d add to think of a CX bike as a slightly more flexible road bike w/r/t tire clearance

Gravel bikes will tend to offer the most flexibility: wide 700m tires, higher bottom bracket if you want to run 650b, mounting holes for racks or fenders, sometimes 3 bottle mounts, that kind of stuff.

All that said you can absolutely find a middle ground of the two. Some “gravel” frames will be more CX in geo and have mounting points on the rear while providing a carbon fork up front. Brands like Stinner, BreadWinner, Crust, Spedvagen, and those boutique brands offer the more middle ground options.
 
Could anyone recommend me a good under layer for riding in 40-60 degree westher. I want to keep riding until at least the end of October, but I don’t have any cold weather gear at all.
 
Could anyone recommend me a good under layer for riding in 40-60 degree westher. I want to keep riding until at least the end of October, but I don’t have any cold weather gear at all.
40 to 60 can cover a vast range. If it's 60 and sunny, I'm wearing summer kit and unzipping on the climbs. If it's 40 at night and you're being coated in wet snow, uninsulated clothing can result in mild frostbite.

I'd recommend picking up a short-sleeved base layer (such as a Bontrager B2 Short-Sleeve), and having a pair of arm warmers for when it'll be cool but you don't need or want a full jacket.
Get some full-finger gloves. For mild conditions these really only need to be windbreaking, and some lightweight summer full-finger MTB gloves can do the job.

And for when things get toward the serious end of the range:
Have a long-sleeved (but not annoyingly loose-fitting) cycling jacket, something like a Castelli Perfetto.
For the legs, have a decent full-length bib tight available, and also shoe covers to keep the feet less unhappy when weather is uncertain. The bib tights go over the shoe covers for optimal water shedding.

If you want to actually get your fall/winter/spring game on, set up a bike with good fenders. Low enough in front to protect your feet and drivetrain, low enough in back to protect the person behind you, wide enough around the tire and with a well-designed lip so that captured water gets channeled to the ground rather than splashed to the side, and good-looking on a bike that's designed to accept fenders.
 
Could anyone recommend me a good under layer for riding in 40-60 degree westher. I want to keep riding until at least the end of October, but I don’t have any cold weather gear at all.
You’re in NH right or mass?

Sometimes you can get by with just a vest and arm warmers down to high 40s, then throw in some knee warmers and shoe covers. I personally like vests because it lets your arms act like the heat sink instead of bottling up all inside a jacket. Also don’t go crazy on big thick bulky gloves. Full fingers can easily get you into the low 50s esp on a sunny day. And lastly keep in mind there is a difference in a wind jacket and rain jacket. Don’t buy a rain jacket and expect it to be fine for fall riding w/ breathing.

It takes a lot of trial and error because everyone heats up differently. I know I take time to warm up but also sweat a ton. So I need things that can block wind but breath super well.
 
You’re in NH right or mass?

Sometimes you can get by with just a vest and arm warmers down to high 40s, then throw in some knee warmers and shoe covers. I personally like vests because it lets your arms act like the heat sink instead of bottling up all inside a jacket. Also don’t go crazy on big thick bulky gloves. Full fingers can easily get you into the low 50s esp on a sunny day. And lastly keep in mind there is a difference in a wind jacket and rain jacket. Don’t buy a rain jacket and expect it to be fine for fall riding w/ breathing.

It takes a lot of trial and error because everyone heats up differently. I know I take time to warm up but also sweat a ton. So I need things that can block wind but breath super well.
CT which’s the same thing pretty much.

I don’t expect to be riding for much longer this year, just want to get as much riding as possible with spending too much money, I’m not a fan of cold weather riding anyway. A good under layer, leg warmers and gloves sounds like it should be enough.
 
CT which’s the same thing pretty much.

I don’t expect to be riding for much longer this year, just want to get as much riding as possible with spending too much money, I’m not a fan of cold weather riding anyway. A good under layer, leg warmers and gloves sounds like it should be enough.
I personally have a wind jacket and wind vest (which is kind of like mesh on the back), knee warmers, wool arm warmers, hats, wool oversocks (DeFeet makes em) and this can honestly keep me more than comfortable down to the 40s as long as it's not wet. You can also try buying a wool long sleeve jersey or regular long sleeve jersey to mix it up. I just prefer the more flexible approach because I don't want to be doing long sleeve base, long sleeve jersey, jacket because that's just going to be an over. And a long sleeve base under a short sleeve can hurt you too because you can't remove the arms. So yeah, just think about how you can optimize best for when on the bike and go from there. It's much easier to remove and add, then to be stuck with too much and be sweating way too much.
 
A light earband is nice to keep the ears warm as well. They get cold quickly when exposed.
I might need something just to keep the wind out. I have pretty big ears and it’s started to get a little windy this week so I get earache quite quickly.

Also noticing how much a headwind can affect you - feels like I’m almost in a higher gear
 
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