Bicycle ERA |OT| This Is Why

Is this like a team time trial? How does it work?
It's a time trial, but each team rides as a group.

In typical TTT rules, the time awarded to a team is that of the Nth person across the line, with N depending on the rules of a particular event. Anyone who finishes ahead of the Nth person does not receive a faster time than that person; however, anyone who got dropped and is finishing after the Nth person is usually given their actual time as if it were an individual time trial.
It's common for teams to let their weaker time trialists get dropped on a TTT, but they generally don't allow the size of their paceline to fall below N, because there's no benefit to finishing ahead of your Nth rider.
 
It's a time trial, but each team rides as a group.

In typical TTT rules, the time awarded to a team is that of the Nth person across the line, with N depending on the rules of a particular event. Anyone who finishes ahead of the Nth person does not receive a faster time than that person; however, anyone who got dropped and is finishing after the Nth person is usually given their actual time as if it were an individual time trial.
It's common for teams to let their weaker time trialists get dropped on a TTT, but they generally don't allow the size of their paceline to fall below N, because there's no benefit to finishing ahead of your Nth rider.
When TTT begin to split it can feel like watching a slow train wreck. It was either BMC or Quick Step 2 years ago the final person into the stretch began to trail and the sense of the whole thing began to feel tense. Because that one rider could be a podium or not.
 
It's a time trial, but each team rides as a group.

In typical TTT rules, the time awarded to a team is that of the Nth person across the line, with N depending on the rules of a particular event. Anyone who finishes ahead of the Nth person does not receive a faster time than that person; however, anyone who got dropped and is finishing after the Nth person is usually given their actual time as if it were an individual time trial.
It's common for teams to let their weaker time trialists get dropped on a TTT, but they generally don't allow the size of their paceline to fall below N, because there's no benefit to finishing ahead of your Nth rider.
Oh, that’s a pretty cool format.
 
Is this like a team time trial? How does it work?
Yep it's a TTT. Basically each team sets off at different times and race to the finish,. The overall finish time is based on the last rider over the line so the teams stay as close together as possible as it's easier to ride in a group than have the fastest rider leave the rest behind.
 
I might not be the best example when it comes to cold weather riding.
I only start wearing long tights or long sleeves below 50-60 fahrenheit, depending on wind.
I'll only wear a jacket or extra layer if it dips below 40.
 
I'm curently thinking about what I want and need for winter commuting... I think on Rain days, I will just use my Mammut hardshell, don't really wan't to buy an expensive rain jacket just for commuting, will probably need some decent windstopper jacket for when it gets colder and not raining. Have rain trousers and a pair of long cycling shorts and shoe covers already. Thinking abou getting arm and leg warmers since autumn weather at least until october can mean 40-55 fahrenheit in the morning and 70-90 in the afternoon when I ride back.

Today my chain snapped 20km into my commute.... at least it was right by a public transport station and there is a bikeshop relatively close to the office... bad luck this week yesterday I had my first Puncture since starting commuting (2000 km) .
 
I'm curently thinking about what I want and need for winter commuting... I think on Rain days, I will just use my Mammut hardshell, don't really wan't to buy an expensive rain jacket just for commuting, will probably need some decent windstopper jacket for when it gets colder and not raining. Have rain trousers and a pair of long cycling shorts and shoe covers already. Thinking abou getting arm and leg warmers since autumn weather at least until october can mean 40-55 fahrenheit in the morning and 70-90 in the afternoon when I ride back.

Today my chain snapped 20km into my commute.... at least it was right by a public transport station and there is a bikeshop relatively close to the office... bad luck this week yesterday I had my first Puncture since starting commuting (2000 km) .
A good rain jacket will be able to do both. They'll be expesnive, but then you only need 1 jacket. If they have giant pitzips that's even better
 
I upgraded the fixie with a 710mm flat bar. It's way more confidence inspiring now but unfortunately my MTB muscle memory is trying to kill me from time to time because I forget to keep pedaling.

 
Hey guys!

More than 15 years have passed since I last rode a bike (except an indoor bike, which I ride almost daily) but in the last year or so I've been looking at getting into the MTB because I want to spend more time outside. The problem is that it's an expensive sport so I wanted to try it out a bit before starting with the equipment shopping spree. Mainly to see how my fucked up wrist would react to all the shaking during a ride.

So last week I went to a bike park close to where I live. I wanted to go alone to save myself the embarrassment and indeed I was pretty much the only person in the woods. I got my ass into a gondola and rented a bike and a helmet when i got on top. I guess I looked pretty green because the dude told me I can take the bike only to the Pussycat Trail. Lol Pussycat Trail no problem right...?!! Well I soon found out why there was nobody else riding that day. It was raining for 4 or 5 days before and I thought I will dry out by the time I got there... Nope. It was pretty wet and all the rocks and roots were quite slippery. I had a feeling I have very little control of the bike and was mostly just hanging on and it seemed to me that I fixated too much on every single rock so I eventually ended up hitting every single one of them. And this Pussycat Trail is a sort of natural single track which means they left all the rocks and roots where they are except for a few cleaned out and widened berms. But those looked way too slippery for me to try riding them. Me and the bike went our separate ways 3 or 4 times and 1 time I performed a one-armed monkey stand on a tree saving myself from flying off a trail. Other than that it was quite a fun ride. I liked the feeling of a bike dancing under me while riding.

So the next step for me will be joining in on one of the guided group tours around the trails on a hill behind my appartment. From what I've seen there are a number of pretty awesome trails that are being taken care of by the group of guys providing these free guided tours. The cool thing is that it seems there are also trails which are beginner friendly. This is the place where I might spend the majority of my time riding if I decide to plunge into the sport. But I'm definitely waiting a few days for trails to dry out after the rain.

However the first thing I'm going to buy is a fullface brain bucket, goggles and gloves because the lid I got in the bike park (and paid 10€ for it) staaaaaank like somebody died in that. And it was cracked in a few places. Seriously this was the last time I ever rented a helmet. That smell stayed in my mind for 3 days. Brrrrr...

As for the bike... For the guided tour a group organizing those will probably provide me with one but after that I'll have buy something. Now I don't want to charge in with some expensive bike because judging from my experience in the bike park it's probably gonna get crashed and scratched a few times so I'm looking for a used bike on a local portal for selling used bikes. From my uneducated point of view some 2-3 year old hardtail with a slack head angle and 27.5 or 27.5+ tyres would do the trick. Something like a Commencal Meta HT AM probably. I definitely don't want a XC bike because I would also like to take it to a bike park a few times and would generaly prefer descents over riding up the hill. I have absolutely no idea what I'm supposed to be looking at in terms of components though...

Any advice about anything would be appreciated.

Cheers!
 
Where you living and riding? That will dictate a ton on the kind of bike to recommend to you.
I'm not sure what kind of info I'm supposed to provide because I havent ridden a bike for more than 15 years, let alone do any mtb prior to last week. I live in South Central Europe close to the Alps. In terms of riding that I would like to do... I'm interested in taking a few steps back from my time in bike park last week and start with basics and then go from there. Ultimately I would like to comfortably ride flowy trails and not overly steep or technical single tracks and occasionaly visit a few bike parks and take a bike to see a mountain peak or 2. I'm not at all interested in speed and huge jumps/drops. Overall I'm more interested in descending and less in climbing so I'm looking for a bike that can dampen strain on the wrist as best as possible (if this is even possible for a hardtail) because I have a fucked up right wrist. I'm not sure how much the travel on the fork suspension affects the shock to the wrist but I guess in my simplified opinion this is the most important spec. Or am I mistaken here and geometry+seating position are more important?? Or a tire size...? Anyways I would like to spend the least amount of time driving on the straight roads and spend the most of my time descending while still being able to ride up the simple roads or trails.

Would a used 2016 Commencal Meta HT AM be ok for this?

If you guys have any advice it would be apreciated. Not just in terms of the bike but also in general related to MTB.
 
The new Santa Cruz 5010 is gettin a lot of love as a good enduro bike (the style of riding you described).

My main advice is always invest smart the first time. This means recognizing where you can best spend your money and have a bike you can grow with. You don’t need that 8K downhill monster bike, but you also don’t need to go so cheap on some canal path mountain bike. If you can aim for 2-3500 that should get you into the range I’m talking about. That 5010 I mentioned is 2800 and should last you a long time and you can certainly grow with it.
 
The new Santa Cruz 5010 is gettin a lot of love as a good enduro bike (the style of riding you described).

My main advice is always invest smart the first time. This means recognizing where you can best spend your money and have a bike you can grow with. You don’t need that 8K downhill monster bike, but you also don’t need to go so cheap on some canal path mountain bike. If you can aim for 2-3500 that should get you into the range I’m talking about. That 5010 I mentioned is 2800 and should last you a long time and you can certainly grow with it.
That was kind of the price point where I started initially but then when I went through the part checklist I kept asking myself if I really need this or if I would even notice the difference compared to cheaper components. And then I sort of decided to start looking for a 2-3 year old used hardtail bike for sub 1000€. So this is where I’m at currently.

Btw I noticed on the 2nd page that you have or had Kona Honzo. Do you think this would be an ok bike for my needs in terms of geometry. If I’m not mistaken Honzo is a 29er but the new 2019 Big Honzo is a 27.5+er with 130mm travel on the fork. Maybe I would be interested in this if rent bikes for a year and buy next year... :D
 
That was kind of the price point where I started initially but then when I went through the part checklist I kept asking myself if I really need this or if I would even notice the difference compared to cheaper components. And then I sort of decided to start looking for a 2-3 year old used hardtail bike for sub 1000€. So this is where I’m at currently.

Btw I noticed on the 2nd page that you have or had Kona Honzo. Do you think this would be an ok bike for my needs in terms of geometry. If I’m not mistaken Honzo is a 29er but the new 2019 Big Honzo is a 27.5+er with 130mm travel on the fork. Maybe I would be interested in this if rent bikes for a year and buy next year... :D
I do have a Kono Big Honzo and it’s been really great. My shop is a Kona dealer and we all have Honzo’s. They’re perfect for where we are: low elevation, flowy single track. Hell, we’ve taken them to bike parks and people were flabbergasted at us riding hard tails through it. Now, while it is just fine I would have been way more comfortable on a full suspension bike for it. The 5010 is one they just rode on demos and fell in love with. It’s a really good enduro option and if your aim is to mix it up that’s why I suggested it. It’d be a good catch all bike that will last you.

As for the tires, 27.5 has been great for me to get comfortable with and keep on. I could go to 29, which are definitely more fun, but the new wheel set I have has made the bike way more fast & fun.
 
Is this a good commuter bike?

Momentum iNeed Street DD $430

https://www.momentum-biking.com/us/ineed-street-dd

Actually is that commuter bike better than this commuter bike?

The Kona Dew Plus 2019 $699

http://www.konaworld.com/dew_plus.cfm


I can afford $700 but some of the built in bells and whistles on the iNeedStreet seem cool to me.

Looking for some more advice ..... Thanks!
Difference with those two is that the Kona can go fast if you want to go fast. That other one, strictly for pootling (it's a Giant though so the components are reliable I'm sure).
 
Is this a good commuter bike?

Momentum iNeed Street DD $430

https://www.momentum-biking.com/us/ineed-street-dd

Actually is that commuter bike better than this commuter bike?

The Kona Dew Plus 2019 $699

http://www.konaworld.com/dew_plus.cfm


I can afford $700 but some of the built in bells and whistles on the iNeedStreet seem cool to me.

Looking for some more advice ..... Thanks!
This is really dependent on the kind of use you’re looking for.

The Kona is more active. The riding position is a bit more sporty. It’ll get you around town quicker.

The iNeedstreet is more comfortable. More upright riding position. It’ll get you where you want comfortable but slower.

That said I think the bells and whistles aren’t too important. Who uses a cup holder on a bike?! (You can easily add a bottle holder to the Kona for instance)
The discbrakes on the Kona will need more maintenance, but the overal group set is a bit higher end.

The two bikes are completely different in terms of how you approach cycling.
I don’t think there will be a huge difference in quality, it’s a question of fast or comfortable.
 
there's been more than one instance where i would've been very happy to have a cupholder for a coffee or bubble tea while riding.
trying to fit a half empty fountain cup into the seat tube bottle holder is barely adequate.
 
there's been more than one instance where i would've been very happy to have a cupholder for a coffee or bubble tea while riding.
trying to fit a half empty fountain cup into the seat tube bottle holder is barely adequate.
Stem bags are great for that. They're great for everything in fact.
 
Began specing our parts for my potential custom frame build next year. Probably looking around 4500-5000 at the end of day. I’m about half way saved up so I’m hoping I can be 75% by Feb/March to put the frame order in and have it for June.
 
Thanks to the Trump tariffs bicycle prices are headed higher. Trek looks to have bumped up prices across the board today, my bike is about $150 higher today than last month. Prices may be even higher come the 1st of January.
 
This is really dependent on the kind of use you’re looking for.

The Kona is more active. The riding position is a bit more sporty. It’ll get you around town quicker.

The iNeedstreet is more comfortable. More upright riding position. It’ll get you where you want comfortable but slower.

That said I think the bells and whistles aren’t too important. Who uses a cup holder on a bike?! (You can easily add a bottle holder to the Kona for instance)
The discbrakes on the Kona will need more maintenance, but the overal group set is a bit higher end.

The two bikes are completely different in terms of how you approach cycling.
I don’t think there will be a huge difference in quality, it’s a question of fast or comfortable.
Thanks! I want a faster bike.
 
So, help me choose my next road/hybrid bicycle!

I narrowed my options to the following (the groupset is pretty much the same, Sora).

Specialized Diverge alloy:



Price: ~$1400.

Pros:

  • I found one with a discount, so is great for the price.
  • I really like the concept of a gravel capable road bicycle.
  • Seems to get rave reviews everywhere.

Cons:
  • I don't like the light blue colour much.
  • Is not a real road bike.
  • The price is on the higher end of what I'm looking to spend.


Specialized Sirrus Alloy Disc



Price: ~$900.

Pros:

  • Second cheapest option.
  • Seems robust.
  • I'm used to riding in the upright position.
  • I like how it looks.
  • Is also discounted.
  • I could also use its mountain cycling credentials on occasion.

Cons:
  • Even further from a road bike.
  • Middling reviews.
  • My brompton is a fine city bike, so I don't want another.

Loma:

Price:
$1500

Pros:
  • Is bamboo so is friggin cool.
  • I like to own unique stuff.
  • I like it how it looks a lot.
  • Seems like a road bike (?).
  • Locally made, so is good for the economy.

Cons:

  • Performance is unknown.
  • Quality is unknown.
  • Heavier than the Specialized bicycles.
  • The frame requires special care.



Bennoto Ruta THRIATHLON


Price:
$500

Pros:
  • The cheapest option by a good margin.
  • Is locally made, so is good for the economy.
  • I like the rims.
  • Seems like a road bike.
  • Is well known brand over here, so its quality is a known quantity over the Loma.
  • A lower end bicycle might be all I need.

Cons:
  • The design is a bit too busy for my tastes.
  • Fork is aluminium, unlike the others.
  • Being cheaper, is less exclusive.
  • The heaviest option (about 12kg).
So, which one do you guys recommend? Which one would you guys choose?
 
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Specialized Diverge alloy:



Price: ~$1400.

Pros:

  • I found one with a discount, so is great for the price.
  • I really like the concept of a gravel capable road bicycle.
  • Seems to get rave reviews everywhere.

Cons:
  • I don't like the light blue colour much.
  • Is not a real road bike.
  • The price is on the higher end of what I'm looking to spend.
What particular concerns do you have with "is not a real road bike"?

Specialized Sirrus Alloy Disc



Price: ~$900.

Pros:
  • Second cheapest option.
  • Seems robust.
  • I'm used to riding in the upright position.
  • I like how it looks.
  • Is also discounted.
  • I could also use its mountain cycling credentials on occasion.

Cons:
  • Even further from a road bike.
  • Middling reviews.
  • My brompton is a fine city bike, so I don't want another.
Aside from a bit more tire clearance, I'm not sure that the Sirrus has any more "mountain cycling credentials" than something like the Diverge does. Both bikes can leave the pavement just fine, but neither is really designed to handle nicely on technical stuff.

Loma:

Price: $1500

Pros:
  • Is bamboo so is friggin cool.
  • I like to own unique stuff.
  • I like it how it looks a lot.
  • Seems like a road bike (?).
  • Locally made, so is good for the economy.

Cons:

  • Performance is unknown.
  • Quality is unknown.
  • Heavier than the Specialized bicycles.
  • The frame requires special care.
What special care does it require?

In what way are you suspicious that it's not a road bike? That thing is, in no uncertain terms, a road bike.

Bennoto Ruta THRIATHLON


Price: $500

Pros:
  • The cheapest option by a good margin.
  • Is locally made, so is good for the economy.
  • I like the rims.
  • Seems like a road bike.
  • Is well known brand over here, so its quality is a known quantity over the Loma.
  • A lower end bicycle might be all I need.

Cons:
  • The design is a bit too busy for my tastes.
  • Fork is aluminium, unlike the others.
  • Being cheaper, is less exclusive.
  • The heaviest option (about 12kg).
I have to admit I'm actually a bit impressed, in a confused way. For a weird low-end machine trying to look high-performance, there's some serious effort in this one. The aesthetics actually sort of achieve what they're aiming for. And although I was initially baffled by the "TRIATHLON" decals, thinking that this was an attempt at tricking people who hadn't seen an actual triathlon bike since the 1980s... I realized that it is actually inspired by the 1980s Benotto Triathlon model line!

Bizarre.
 
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