Bicycle ERA |OT| This Is Why

Any recommendation for a middle range clipless pedals for my new bike? Ty!
For road riding, I like SPD-SL. They're available across whatever price range you feel like.

If there will be gravel mixed in, or if you just want extra walkability, consider using an "MTB" pedal type like SPD. The cleats are more durable, and far more resilient to getting clogged.
If you want your SPDs to have a bit more road attitude than the typical ones like M520, look at A520 and A600 pedals.
 
So, I just took my new ride on an 1 hour ride and... WTF? Since more oftten that not I'm one of the fastest cyclist in the city, I didn't thought that my heavily customised Brompton was holding me back that much... but after getting used to my new ride for a bit the difference became enormous. From reaching 36-38km/h on flat to 40-42km/h with the same effort...

I need better pedals, though.
 
So, I just took my new ride on an 1 hour ride and... WTF? Since more oftten that not I'm one of the fastest cyclist in the city, I didn't thought that my heavily customised Brompton was holding me back that much... but after getting used to my new ride for a bit the difference became enormous. From reaching 36-38km/h on flat to 40-42km/h with the same effort...

I need better pedals, though.
26mph on a flat with basic pedals? That's some serious watts, bordering on pro speeds.
 
I was assuming it was a sustained effort to offer a decent comparison between the bikes.
Sadly, there's no much space for sustained speed in the city, and since I'm still getting used to the bicycle I didn't dare to take it to the routes were longer sustained speeds can be achieved. Sorry :(

But I have taken that route many times and this time it definitively feel faster. less nimble, though.
 
Sadly, there's no much space for sustained speed in the city, and since I'm still getting used to the bicycle I didn't dare to take it to the routes were longer sustained speeds can be achieved. Sorry :(
? I feel like my reply was misinterpreted. I was just meaning I assumed you had done a long ride which garnered a sustained speed and this was the basis of your bike comparison.

I don't know where people live, therefore wasn't aware you were in a city.
 
New bike update!

The cassette for the Campeur is arriving today, which means it's GEARING TIME.

The rest of the drivetrain will consist of stuff that I've got laying around: an old 50-40-28 touring triple, an unmarked front derailleur that it was paired with on its original bike, a cheapo Shimano MTB derailleur, and some SunTour bar-end friction shifters.

The new cassette is an 8-speed, 12-14-16-18-21-24-28-32. The crankset had previously been paired with a TZ20 6-speed freewheel, which has exactly the same gears but without the 12 on the top and 32 on the bottom, and I liked the combo.

Here's a logarithmic chart of the resulting gearing:



When paired with 700x35 tires, the 50-12 top gear is 113 gear inches. This is 6-12% lower than the top gear on most road racing bikes, but I'm not overly concerned: modern road racing bikes have a really high high-end, and even if I use the bike for spirited riding with racers, 113 inches is nearly always more than adequate. A mostly-manageable 120rpm spin still gets me over 40mph!

The 28-32 low gear is about 24 gear inches. By comparison, a typical 34-28 low gear on a road racing bike with 700x25 tires is around 35% higher. It's pretty low, although if I ever do any mountainous stuff with the bike significantly loaded, it might be important.

Total gear range, a healthy 476%.

Gear spacing is where the fun starts. The cassette itself is pretty wide-spaced, with an average gap of 15% between gears, and a maximum jump of roughly 17%. However, the 50T and 40T chainrings create intermediate gears for each other, and the shifting between those chainrings end up very crisp. So when I'm on the road and want tight spacing, I can double-shift between the rings to have intermediate gears.
I've marked the relevant area in the gear chart with a red perimeter. It covers from 45 to 97 gear inches, which at 100rpm pedaling cadence is 13.5mph to 29mph. When taking advantage of the intermediate gears, the average gear step in the region is about 7.2%, with a maximum step of 11%.
...
With extremely ambitious double-shifting, and adding the small ring into the scheme, it could be argued that this 3x8 drivetrain is worth up to maybe 20 meaningful unique gear ratios. Within the bounds of reasonable convenience, 17-18 ratios is probably a more accurate description.
 
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First session of DH coaching today. Took it pretty easy because of the rib, but still learned a few things.

Need to get back on the trails and get my confidence up a bit before going back and hitting the bigger stuff.
 
God damn a triple chain?
Yes, triples are great.
The smaller ratio jumps they allow have several advantages. Upshifts are typically snappier and less disruptive because the chain requires less lifting. For a given cassette, front shifts require less compensatory double-shifting. And because the smaller jumps make shift gates less critical, there's more freedom in gearing selection, at least if you're working in a BCD with lots of options.
Also, for drivetrains of the same tier and gear range, the smaller cassettes of the triple tend to make them just as lightweight as the double.

It also would have been very difficult to create the arrangement of range and spacing that I want with a double, even with 11 cogs out back.
 
Yes, triples are great.
The smaller ratio jumps they allow have several advantages. Upshifts are typically snappier and less disruptive because the chain requires less lifting. For a given cassette, front shifts require less compensatory double-shifting. And because the smaller jumps make shift gates less critical, there's more freedom in gearing selection, at least if you're working in a BCD with lots of options.
Also, for drivetrains of the same tier and gear range, the smaller cassettes of the triple tend to make them just as lightweight as the double.

It also would have been very difficult to create the arrangement of range and spacing that I want with a double, even with 11 cogs out back.
Yeah it’s all sound logic it’s just weird to me. I rarely see triples around me with most still riding doubles. Very few are running singles
 
After reading this dissection on gearing, I'm starting to question my decision to roll a 48x15 ratio on my fixed gear Kilo TT. I should probably spin more with a 70-75ish gear inch ratio, but fuck it, I'm more of a sprinter and want to push 25+mph here and there on the streets.
 
After reading this dissection on gearing, I'm starting to question my decision to roll a 48x15 ratio on my fixed gear Kilo TT. I should probably spin more with a 70-75ish gear inch ratio, but fuck it, I'm more of a sprinter and want to push 25+mph here and there on the streets.
Honestly top speed isn’t worth dying on a slight hill
 
Honestly top speed isn’t worth dying on a slight hill
I can hang with 4% or so gradients for about a kilometer, then I start to get squirrely. My legs are strong for quick and punchy inclines, and most of my riding is pretty flat. I'm planning on getting a proper road bike anyway, so I don't mind having a relatively big gear for the relatively flat commuting and recreational rides that I do right now.

At certain inclines and distances fixed gear is actually the best best because of the efficiency. Anything past about a kilometer though, and it's pretty much over.
 
You can get good kids bikes... but most people aren't buying 1000+ USD bikes for their kids.
Yeah. Parents mostly see them as kids toys that will be rapidly outgrown.
There are also lots of sizes to cover, which creates economy-of-scale issues. The price point won't budge, so the quality takes a hit.

There are decent kids bikes out there, but they're uncommon.
 
Yeah, if you want to spend lots of money on a kid's bike that'll be outgrown in a couple of years, there are lightweight options out there like Frog or Isla bikes. But if you're talking £100 for a kid's bike it's an unfair comparison to even a £500 adult bike.
 


I got this for my daughter. She's just over a year old.

It's a bamboo bike, super lightweight :P
She's zipping around the house and outside with it. When she starts to walk a bit more steadily on her own I'll flip the rear axle so it's a two wheeler.
 
FondsNL that looks like a nice one, will have a look for my daughter for next year :) .

Bought a Hardtail MTB (cannondale Beast of the east 3) which I can pick up today, looking forward to do some biking again even with my limited time, should also be able to take a trail or two on the way to and back from work when I decide to take the MTB.

Getting a bit annoyed at my Garmin Edge 130, tried to load some .gpx routes onto it and as soon as I do that it freezes and can only be recovered with a hard reset which means setting up all the datapages again and pairing it with the phone and sensors...

 
Yeah, if you want to spend lots of money on a kid's bike that'll be outgrown in a couple of years, there are lightweight options out there like Frog or Isla bikes. But if you're talking £100 for a kid's bike it's an unfair comparison to even a £500 adult bike.
I managed to get a frog and an Isla bike for£100 and £150 second hand. It’s worth shopping about and spending a little bit more. Both kids zoom about on them no problem. 5 year old did 6 miles the other week which impressed me.
 
I managed to get a frog and an Isla bike for£100 and £150 second hand. It’s worth shopping about and spending a little bit more. Both kids zoom about on them no problem. 5 year old did 6 miles the other week which impressed me.
Aye, second hand is a good shout, although they tend to hold their value ridiculously well in my experience. They are great, though - the lack of weight really helps wee ones to get about.
 
https://news.sky.com/story/halfords-rides-to-rescue-of-struggling-rival-evans-cycles-11509519

Halfords rides to rescue of struggling rival Evans Cycles
Halfords, which has a market value of more than £670m, tabled an offer for Evans earlier this week, Sky News understands.


Halfords already have a few other online brands under their wing, hopefully they'll let Evans continue without too much interference, if this all goes ahead of course.
That would be great news. :)
 
Aye, second hand is a good shout, although they tend to hold their value ridiculously well in my experience. They are great, though - the lack of weight really helps wee ones to get about.
Yeah it’s the weight that makes the difference. I got lucky with the second hand bikes. Mostly they only go about £50 less than the usual new price.

It’s really nice taking them both out, although slightly scary near roads. Luckily we have a lot of cycle paths and gravel near us.
 
Damn. Why didnt you guys told me how hard was going to clip!? Any tip!? Ty!
What are you having trouble with?

If it's targeting the cleat, this is something that just gets better with experience.
If you're requiring a lot of force to clip in, you could try reducing the tension of the pedal's retention mechanism. Some clipless pedals ship with the mechanisms very tight.
 
Yes. Targeting the clip mostly.
I started riding clipless (SPD) . again after a long long time. Just clip in a lot just lean against a wall and clip in and out until it comes natural. Pedals that allow to clip in from both sides defenitly help, and lowering the tension to the lowest point.

Man forgot how brutal uphills can be especially singletracks and accessroads that have a grad of 20+ . For my shitty legs 30x40 . just doesn't cut it... Like the bike quite a bit, but also didn't ride anything to rowdy since I'm getting used to riding MTB again. Will probably check my Fork settings, feeling that my LBS set it up with a bit to much air.
 
The year I started my amazing journey with cycling Sagan won the rainbow jersey. I don’t know what it is to live in a world where he isn’t the world champion.

Congrats to Valverde, about time he finally won it.
 
Any mountain bikers on here? Spent my morning at the Forest of Dean on the jump line trying to improve my jumping, just going over and over again. Made some progress as I got more used to the sensation of being in the air and was able to actually start to clear the table tops and get that nice flow going. Fun, but overall it was fairly inconsistent I think. Just need to practice more I guess, nail the take off a bit better. Back to the videos I go!

Tell you what though, there is a huge disconnect between what I feel like I'm doing and what I'm actually doing. Feels like I'm getting 6ft of clear sexy air, I got one of the guys there to video me, I'm actually getting more like 6 inches of air with really poor form. Ha!

I'll keep trying. Ultimately goal is to be able to jump with confidence, maybe chuck the odd whip in there if I get proper good.
 
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