Christian Era |OT| W.W.J.D

#1


Welcome to Christian Era! My first OT also, so forgive me for the blandness! Wanted to make a community thread for anyone who’s a Christian on Era!

We can have a centralized place to:

  • Discuss upcoming events around us
  • Talk about what’s going on in our churches and communities
  • Discuss Bible
  • Share about readings and interpretations
  • Etc.
Anyone, and everyone, is welcome! Doesn’t matter if your Pentecostal, Catholic, or Baptist; Want to discuss your favorite Christian artist/singer/author; Debate about some findings or research you’ve been doing. Always remember, “W.W.J.D?”!
 
#2
Had an awesome service today! Amazing worship and good preaching! Message was titled “When Angel food is still not enough”. Talked about in Numbers when the children of Israel were wanting to go back to their old ways as slaves in Egypt after God took them out and was taking them to the promise land. Alluded to how a lot of people today don’t see where they’re headed with their Christian walk as good enough, and want to return to how they used to be. Can’t wait until Wednesday for Bible Study!

How was everyone else’s Sunday?
 
#3
My Sunday was great, thanks for asking. I was looking for ChristianEra and I'm glad one was established.

I'll give a quick background on myself and my faith: I was raised a believer in a pretty conventional Pentecostal Christian upbringing. I did Royal Rangers, summer camps, pretty much the whole deal but I haven't really felt as alive in my faith as I do now and it has literally changed me from top to bottom. From the way I interact with people to how I view the world is wholly colored by my relationship with God.

I currently go to a small church in South Florida operating in a middle school "cafetorium." The body is mostly comprised of people I grew up with (it's led by the youth pastor of the "big church" I went to in high school) and I'd consider it "non-denominational."

The message this Sunday was called (and was about) Holy Spirit. Our pastor centered on John 16:5 where in which Jesus talks about sending the Helper (Holy Spirit). I get really excited when I think about it because Jesus got excited when he spoke about it. Calling upon the Holy Spirit in our daily lives not as a crutch but simply to get closer to God has really changed my life over the past few years and it was good to hear a message revisit the subject.
 
#4
Ex-Christian atheist here, just wishing y'all a good time in the thread and hoping nobody comes and shits it up. All the best!
 
#5
My Sunday was great, thanks for asking. I was looking for ChristianEra and I'm glad one was established.

I'll give a quick background on myself and my faith: I was raised a believer in a pretty conventional Pentecostal Christian upbringing. I did Royal Rangers, summer camps, pretty much the whole deal but I haven't really felt as alive in my faith as I do now and it has literally changed me from top to bottom. From the way I interact with people to how I view the world is wholly colored by my relationship with God.

I currently go to a small church in South Florida operating in a middle school "cafetorium." The body is mostly comprised of people I grew up with (it's led by the youth pastor of the "big church" I went to in high school) and I'd consider it "non-denominational."

The message this Sunday was called (and was about) Holy Spirit. Our pastor centered on John 16:5 where in which Jesus talks about sending the Helper (Holy Spirit). I get really excited when I think about it because Jesus got excited when he spoke about it. Calling upon the Holy Spirit in our daily lives not as a crutch but simply to get closer to God has really changed my life over the past few years and it was good to hear a message revisit the subject.
Glad to see you here, RSena7! I know what you mean about feeling alive in your faith now. I was raised Baptist but didn’t start actually being “in church” until I received the Holy Ghost in April 2015. It definitely is a game changer!

Had a youth revival to weeks ago @ POBC in BossierCity. 79 got the Holy Ghost And 23 we’re miraculously healed! Love when the Holy Ghost gets moving. Can’t stop that train, haha! Our church has a small congregation, too. Ranges 20-30 depending on the Sunday. I like it small, though, because you get to know everyone more closely than humorous churches.
 
#7
Mass in a foreign language is interesting. Meeting Japanese Catholics is, too. Only 1% of the country is Catholic, and I get a minority vibe from the community.
 
#8
Glad to see you here, RSena7! I know what you mean about feeling alive in your faith now. I was raised Baptist but didn’t start actually being “in church” until I received the Holy Ghost in April 2015. It definitely is a game changer!

Had a youth revival to weeks ago @ POBC in BossierCity. 79 got the Holy Ghost And 23 we’re miraculously healed! Love when the Holy Ghost gets moving. Can’t stop that train, haha! Our church has a small congregation, too. Ranges 20-30 depending on the Sunday. I like it small, though, because you get to know everyone more closely than humorous churches.
Yea, I grew up in a large church but I really got connected when I switched to a small one. In a sense, I think both large and small communities play (necessary) different roles to achieve the same goal: winning the lost.
 
#9
Ex-Christian atheist here, just wishing y'all a good time in the thread and hoping nobody comes and shits it up. All the best!
I really echo these sentiments -- not in atheism, but whatever floats your boat -- and hope this thread goes well. I'm pretty fatigued by the media's Christian-bashing in the past few years, even though there are significant problems within the ministry and how it enforces its polity and checks its power (or lack thereof). I was raised Roman Catholic, but if I were to ever return to the church (which is likely, just not right now), it'd be at an Episcopal/Anglican cathedral.

A burning question on my mind to everyone in this thread: What are your thoughts on mega-churches in North America? Would you consider their leaders to often be false prophets? Are they tarnishing the image of the Church? Should there be some widespread John 2:19 happening?

Personally, I'd check yes under all.
 
#10
Non-denominational Christian here (currently part of a Calvary Chapel and am part of the worship team), and I fully agree with you Exo. It's a very real concern considering how visible they are, particularly due to how off-base the teaching can get. Not to say that all large churches fall under that category, there are plenty that are sharing the true gospel and are active in providing for the community, but unfortunately their work gets overlooked in favor of the ones that are running their gatherings like a business. A shame, but not unexpected when you consider that scripture speaks towards the tickling of ears.

Looking forward to good things to come in this thread!
 
#11
A burning question on my mind to everyone in this thread: What are your thoughts on mega-churches in North America? Would you consider their leaders to often be false prophets? Are they tarnishing the image of the Church? Should there be some widespread John 2:19 happening?

Personally, I'd check yes under all.
I don't think "mega-churches" are inherently bad. Mega-churches with the intent to acquire wealth (tell tale signs being "seed offering" requests) are certainly heretical. On the other hand, I wouldn't consider Hillsong, Bethel, or even Joel Olsteen's Lakewood church as being in the same class. These church's certainly have their problems (Bill Johnson's pre-election pro-Trump Facebook post was certainly a blow to his ministry from my perspective), but I ultimately I do believe they are winning souls. Discernment is a big part of Christianity, particularly in a country where being Christian means so little.

Just an aside: Jesus requesting the destruction of the Temple in John 2:19 wasn't because the Pharisee had defiled God's house by selling things inside, but to illustrate a shift from the law to grace after his resurrection. Since there would be no need to bring sacrifices to the Temple, the Temple need not exist.
 
#12
A burning question on my mind to everyone in this thread: What are your thoughts on mega-churches in North America? Would you consider their leaders to often be false prophets? Are they tarnishing the image of the Church? Should there be some widespread John 2:19 happening?
I’m not a fan of themose prosperity and mega churches. Like that guy Joel Osteen and others. I honestly believe they are the false teachers and prophets that are talked about in Matthew or Timothy and other books of the NT. The talk about people being lovers of themselves–instead of God’s will– and finding pastors that don’t preach actual Bible. These humongous churches get media attention and people assume that’s what everyone believes and acts that way. One thing that really irks me is all that tithing and offering money from the church. Those should be for the furthering of the Kingdom not their back pockets!



Has any heard any good music lately? Have recently found Hallelujah Chant by Eddie James


And Enter the Gates by Bryan and Katie Torwalt

 
#13
A burning question on my mind to everyone in this thread: What are your thoughts on mega-churches in North America?
If what is being preached is authentic, then there's nothing wrong with mega-churches.

If they're all about that "prosperity theology" though, then no, it's a problem.
 
#14
My church is technically classified as a mega church because there are 6 associated sites here in Seattle averaging around 3000 a week. The main site probably gets close 2000 of those though across 4 services. However they have gone to great lengths to empower those churches with their own leadership and not put a focus on the head pastor as we saw with mars hill. I think it is where the heart of the church and it’s leadership is at. Our pastor has joked that he hated the idea of joining such a large church in the 90s when it was 300 people. It also has to do with the demographics of Seattle that there just aren’t as many of those smaller churches and my church had a strong presence with one of the local universities and a strong post college ministry so a lot of younger folks who move to Seattle tend to find my church.

Been kind of struggling to find my community recently. I had led a small group for the last few years and just started an evening mba program that meant I could no longer participate with that community. And Sundays have been difficult because a bunch of the study and help sessions happen on Sunday which I desperately need. I am hoping to get through this quarter and hope things settle down a bit but could use prayer and encouragement.
 
#15
Been kind of struggling to find my community recently. I had led a small group for the last few years and just started an evening mba program that meant I could no longer participate with that community. And Sundays have been difficult because a bunch of the study and help sessions happen on Sunday which I desperately need. I am hoping to get through this quarter and hope things settle down a bit but could use prayer and encouragement.
I hear you on that Lexad. Been through more than one drought like that in the past and am technically going through a bit of that right now. While I was in University I ran into issues plugging into a campus ministry due to the late night film classes and labs, to the point that I ended up jumping from place to place without any sense of continuity. Ironically, I finally got some stability during that last semester when my now girlfriend (we weren't dating at the time) dragged me over to hers, which ended up being a godsend because I had something to plug into during the year after graduation while I couldn't get a job. I believe that the Lord's got your back on this and that he will provide some sanctuary for you as you get through this quarter, and will be keeping you in my prayers!

In terms of where I'm at these days, things are pretty good. My boss is very understanding and supportive of getting me out the door on the nights I have worship practice, but I am still struggling to get a solid community going as well. I'm now at the point where I am looking to potentially host a young men's fellowship gathering. I was fortunate to have something along those lines growing up that stretched, challenged, and molded me into who I am today, and am realizing it's probably time to start giving back. So hopefully I'll get that going soon.
 
#16
<- Catholic.

Advent is just around the corner. One of my favourite times of year. Such a great antidote to the gross consumerism of the plasticized holiday season.
 
#17
Presbyterian here, but going to nondenominational church at the moment. It feels really good to connect to a church when yoy move into a new place. Initially went to the mega church Harvest in Riverside but was really put off by the pastors views.
 
#18
non-denomimatiomal christian here.

the Bible app on iOS had an imessage update that let you share a verse in imessage by choosing from a list of categories.

it was super convenient for times i didn’t know what to say when giving advice to friends.

i disabled it when i had some issues. might have been updated since then. but to select it all you had to do was go to keyboards and choose Bible as a keyboard.
 
#20
Grew up Methodist and spent the last couple years of high school as baptist. Went to college and found a wonderful non-denomination that met in the gym of a school. Then moved to the PNW and found the non-denom I now go to. On core theological issues, the church probably aligns with baptist, but there are female pastors and the pastor drinks beer haha. Helps the churches history until the 60s was as a baptist church.
 
#23
Anyone and everyone welcome? I don’t mean to intrude, but respectfully, I would like to bring something to the table for anyone who might have thoughts on it. I kinda would like some broader Christian perspective on it, since me and my friend (Roman catholic) have been discussing it a bit lately. It’s about Noah. Now, I’m Jewish so here's some thoughts about him from a more traditional Jewish perspective. I have my own thoughts though.http://www.chabad.org/parshah/artic...Why-Noah-Planted-a-Vineyard-and-Got-Drunk.htm

The question is, was Noah that much of a saintly righteous person, or was he truly the most decent person of his time, with people around him being so corrupt that in today's standards he’d be like Homer Simpson? My argument is that he was like Homer, and his vice was the pleasures of fruit, so after a long journey, that’s why he makes some wine and gets plastered and naked asap. My friend's thoughts on the matter are that he was a very saintly, righteous man, but when you are only human and hundreds of days on a boat with moo moo ara ara eek eek woof woof roar baaaaa and tweet tweet in your ears 24/7 in a log that reeks of animal leavings, even the most patient man can go mad, and needs an outlet for the mental exhaustion caused by the stench and noise.

So, do you think he was stereotypically saintly and righteous, or a crude honest joe who was the most passable choice in a world full of evil?
 
#25
Anyone and everyone welcome? I don’t mean to intrude, but respectfully, I would like to bring something to the table for anyone who might have thoughts on it. I kinda would like some broader Christian perspective on it, since me and my friend (Roman catholic) have been discussing it a bit lately. It’s about Noah. Now, I’m Jewish so here's some thoughts about him from a more traditional Jewish perspective. I have my own thoughts though.http://www.chabad.org/parshah/artic...Why-Noah-Planted-a-Vineyard-and-Got-Drunk.htm

The question is, was Noah that much of a saintly righteous person, or was he truly the most decent person of his time, with people around him being so corrupt that in today's standards he’d be like Homer Simpson? My argument is that he was like Homer, and his vice was the pleasures of fruit, so after a long journey, that’s why he makes some wine and gets plastered and naked asap. My friend's thoughts on the matter are that he was a very saintly, righteous man, but when you are only human and hundreds of days on a boat with moo moo ara ara eek eek woof woof roar baaaaa and tweet tweet in your ears 24/7 in a log that reeks of animal leavings, even the most patient man can go mad, and needs an outlet for the mental exhaustion caused by the stench and noise.

So, do you think he was stereotypically saintly and righteous, or a crude honest joe who was the most passable choice in a world full of evil?
Interesting thought. My personal opinion is that like all men, Noah was a flawed individual that ultimately placed his trust and faith in God, which was counted to him as righteousness much like Abraham. The key to all great figures of the Bible (sans Jesus) is that they all have very real flaws that keep them from being able to be held up as a perfect image of righteous behavior, and it allows us as followers of the word that we are in and of ourselves simply unable to live up to that perfect standard. More critically than that, we aren't in any way expected to by God, whom is more interested in the heart of the individual than the sum of their individual actions.

So in a nutshell, I tend to see Noah getting wasted as a lapse in logic and a character flaw. He had a good heart, but was still clearly a product of the world he came from.
 
#28
My church says that any and all are welcome but won’t officiate a same sex marriage or participate in leadership. If that bothers those folks they kindly point them to a same sex affirming church in the community
 
#29
So, do you think he was stereotypically saintly and righteous, or a crude honest joe who was the most passable choice in a world full of evil?
I agree with LuxCommander's sentiment here that it's not so much either "Noah was a saint, in the church choir, and good at carpentry" or "Eh, this Noah guy will do, I guess; at least he's better than Enoch," and, likely, more that he at least tried to be a godly man, even if he failed at times. Remember, God was going to "wipe from the face of the earth the human race [He had] created [...] But Noah found favor in the eyes of the Lord." Genesis 6:7-8 NIV

In Genesis 6:9, we read that "Noah was a righteous man, blameless among the people of his time, and he walked faithfully with God." The Hebrew word for blameless here seems to be "tamim (tamiym)," complete or sound. I can't actually speak to the signifance of the word without looking into it further, but it is possible someone else could. As is, it could very well simply be that, as LuxCommander said, "Noah was a flawed individual that ultimately placed his trust and faith in God, which was counted to him as righteousness much like Abraham." This is where his "[walking] faithfully with God" comes in, as his trust and faith required some manner of action, seen in his walk with God. Sure, you can trust God, and you can have faith in Him, but can that alone be counted as righteousness? In the big picture, the world was full of wickedness and violence -something we see even today- but Noah still chose to walk with God faithfully. True, he would fall, but that doesn't mean he couldn't get up.

As an added note, this happened in Genesis, and Noah was at that point in time unable to read God's warnings against getting drunk. Was it unwise of him to act in such a manner? Sure. But he still tried to live his life walking faithfully with God.
 
#31
Anyone and everyone welcome? I don’t mean to intrude, but respectfully, I would like to bring something to the table for anyone who might have thoughts on it. I kinda would like some broader Christian perspective on it, since me and my friend (Roman catholic) have been discussing it a bit lately. It’s about Noah. Now, I’m Jewish so here's some thoughts about him from a more traditional Jewish perspective. I have my own thoughts though.http://www.chabad.org/parshah/artic...Why-Noah-Planted-a-Vineyard-and-Got-Drunk.htm

The question is, was Noah that much of a saintly righteous person, or was he truly the most decent person of his time, with people around him being so corrupt that in today's standards he’d be like Homer Simpson? My argument is that he was like Homer, and his vice was the pleasures of fruit, so after a long journey, that’s why he makes some wine and gets plastered and naked asap. My friend's thoughts on the matter are that he was a very saintly, righteous man, but when you are only human and hundreds of days on a boat with moo moo ara ara eek eek woof woof roar baaaaa and tweet tweet in your ears 24/7 in a log that reeks of animal leavings, even the most patient man can go mad, and needs an outlet for the mental exhaustion caused by the stench and noise.

So, do you think he was stereotypically saintly and righteous, or a crude honest joe who was the most passable choice in a world full of evil?
A big thing to consider regarding Old Testament characters and stories is the focus on obedience, not righteousness. Abraham (who took a mistress) obeys God and left his home, Noah obeys God and built the ark, Moses obeys God and returned to Egypt, and David (who committed adultery) obeys God and establishes God's kingdom in Israel. Further, characters like Abraham and Noah were pre-Judaic Law, and it's virtually impossible to really understand what the world was during those nearly pre-civilization times.

Personally, I don't view Noah as a traditionally saintly Biblical figure in the same way I would Paul or Jesus' disciples. He's a symbol of the old covenant -- when piety and obedience was the point -- which looks a lot different than the new covenant.
 
#32
I kind of view most people in the Bible as super flawed individuals. I mean David essentially sent a man to his death in war so he could be with that man's wife. As mentioned though, he still tries to make things better and listens when God speaks to him.
 
#33
I think almost anything in the Bible should be taken with a grain of salt. It was written by man and is thus fallible. A lot of the terrible things used by hateful Christians as a prop comes from the Bible.
 
#36
If I may ask, cj_iwakura, what, in general, do you believe about God and about the Bible?
I believe it was written by people with good intentions but very outdated world views and should not be taken as gospel. The apostles put their own spin and interpretation on Jesus' teachings, for better and for worse.

New Testament wise.
 
#37
I believe it was written by people with good intentions but very outdated world views and should not be taken as gospel. The apostles put their own spin and interpretation on Jesus' teachings, for better and for worse.

New Testament wise.
To a point this is somewhat true, but the apostles do a generally good job of differentiating between Christ and their own opinions. Paul points this out in his own writings, particularly in 1st Corinthians Chapter 7, where he admits that his opinion on celibacy is just that.

I find that the actual "outdated" wordviews tend to be the result of being unable to reconcile the intent of most post-gospel writings due to a tendency to quote scripture outside of it's context. When viewed through the historical prism, the teachings tend to make more sense and allow for a more contemporary viewpoint to emerge. At least in my experience.

What specific interpretations are you referring to, if I might ask?
 
#38
Sorry, I don't want it to feel like I'm picking on you or any such thing, but I am curious as to what spins and interpretations you say they placed on Jesus' teachings. If you would rather drop this bit of discussion instead of continue it -as we could possibly actually go back and forth on it for a short while- that's perfectly fine. I sometimes dabble in apologizing...

Apologetics, sorry, not apologizing. Anyway, I'm kind of interested in this discussion, but I know some people wouldn't be, so I'm just letting you know now in case you don't want to keep it going too long.
 
#39
To a point this is somewhat true, but the apostles do a generally good job of differentiating between Christ and their own opinions. Paul points this out in his own writings, particularly in 1st Corinthians Chapter 7, where he admits that his opinion on celibacy is just that.

I find that the actual "outdated" wordviews tend to be the result of being unable to reconcile the intent of most post-gospel writings due to a tendency to quote scripture outside of it's context. When viewed through the historical prism, the teachings tend to make more sense and allow for a more contemporary viewpoint to emerge. At least in my experience.

What specific interpretations are you referring to, if I might ask?
I can't think of any specific passages in general, maybe I'm thinking more of the Old Testament as an afterthought. I'm sure there's some examples though. It just really gets my goat when people use the Bible as a prop for their racism and hatred.
 
#40
<- Catholic.

Advent is just around the corner. One of my favourite times of year. Such a great antidote to the gross consumerism of the plasticized holiday season.

Bonesy you're RC too? My kids already know to wear purple to the first advent mass so the priest is likely to pick them to light the candle lol
 
#41
Bonesy you're RC too? My kids already know to wear purple to the first advent mass so the priest is likely to pick them to light the candle lol
Yes guy!

Raised in it, left it. Had a 'religious' experience, kind of out of the blue, in 2005. Broke the news to my two eldest that they have to give up candy for Advent this year.
 
#42
I can't think of any specific passages in general, maybe I'm thinking more of the Old Testament as an afterthought. I'm sure there's some examples though. It just really gets my goat when people use the Bible as a prop for their racism and hatred.
I see. Not that I can think of the passages you might be thinking of, though. Especially the New Testament, I can't think of anywhere that actually encourages racism or hatred. Remember, we are called to love our enemies. It doesn't mean we have to be best friends with them or agree with them, but hatred is specifically called out as unacceptable (1 John 4:20-21, for starters). Unforgiveness, even, has some very strong words written against it (Matthew 6:14-15). Anyone who actually uses the Bible to back hate is twisting it to suit their own purposes, which, yes, there are are strong words against that as well (Deuteronomy 4:2).

Now, God did tell the Israelites to wipe a bunch of people out when they entered the promised land, but, as we can see from the results of them not following that command, there was a reason for it, and it eventually left them in captivity in Babylon.
 
#43
Hi, RttP Christian here. I went to Youth Group all through High School and even got hired on for the Summer Intern position a year after I graduated. (Needed to wait a year, it was the rule so that there was some distance in age.)

I met my girlfriend at camp and everything. However, after my Youth Leader whom I was close with got sacked for political reasons I became disillusioned. I stay pretty plugged in, and most placed on the internet scue non-religious. I started to feel like it was all a sham but didn't have the confidence to reject it outright.

I'm not sure what happened... but about a month ago the thought of finality and death hit me. It seems ludicrous, it's not like I hadn't thought about it before, but now the idea feels less theoretical and more eventual.I'm so deeply uncomfortable about the idea of cessation of existence.

Living in Texas I am surrounded by Christians who seem to be so confident about their faith. I want that... I want to feel so confident that I will see my loved ones later... that when my time ends it won't just be endless nothingness. It keeps me up at night, so much so that I have to put on a podcast or something to fade to sleep with.

Has anyone in here ever reapproached religion? How do you come back after giving in to your doubts? I want to have the foundation to build upon...

Obviously I should start by attending an actual place of worship...
 
#44
Hi, RttP Christian here. I went to Youth Group all through High School and even got hired on for the Summer Intern position a year after I graduated. (Needed to wait a year, it was the rule so that there was some distance in age.)

I met my girlfriend at camp and everything. However, after my Youth Leader whom I was close with got sacked for political reasons I became disillusioned. I stay pretty plugged in, and most placed on the internet scue non-religious. I started to feel like it was all a sham but didn't have the confidence to reject it outright.

I'm not sure what happened... but about a month ago the thought of finality and death hit me. It seems ludicrous, it's not like I hadn't thought about it before, but now the idea feels less theoretical and more eventual.I'm so deeply uncomfortable about the idea of cessation of existence.

Living in Texas I am surrounded by Christians who seem to be so confident about their faith. I want that... I want to feel so confident that I will see my loved ones later... that when my time ends it won't just be endless nothingness. It keeps me up at night, so much so that I have to put on a podcast or something to fade to sleep with.

Has anyone in here ever reapproached religion? How do you come back after giving in to your doubts? I want to have the foundation to build upon...

Obviously I should start by attending an actual place of worship...
If I may ask where in Texas are you living. I might know of some churches depending what city you are in or can ask around with my friends still there
 
#45
If I may ask where in Texas are you living. I might know of some churches depending what city you are in or can ask around with my friends still there
About 30 - 40 miles south of Houston. Appreciate it!

I do still have my old church that I liked a lot but left. I know they have a new pastor. Bay Harbour United Methodist was my old spot.
 
#47
That has been one of the hardest parts of leaving Texas and moving to Washington. Definitely have to work harder at finding strong community here
 
#49
About 30 - 40 miles south of Houston. Appreciate it!

I do still have my old church that I liked a lot but left. I know they have a new pastor. Bay Harbour United Methodist was my old spot.
Oh, near League City? I used to live out in Pearland years ago; the family still has friends in Southwest Houston. We used to go to Sagemont off of 45 and the Sam Houston tollway, though that might be a bit of a drive for you. It's also pretty big, though extraordinary inviting (not an exaggeration in the slightest, it's crazy how homey it feels despite being a megachurch. Visited it a few months ago and it hasn't changed in the slightest besides the building getting bigger) and are really good about getting people plugged into community.

I'm in Austin these days though, and most of my Houston trips are on the west side these days. That being said I know for sure that there's some solid churches in your area.


That has been one of the hardest parts of leaving Texas and moving to Washington. Definitely have to work harder at finding strong community here
Dude, so true. Happened for me during the move from Colorado to Austin. You'd think it would have gone smoother than it did, but Austin being what it is made it a good deal harder to find a solid community. The transitory nature of a lot of people in my age bracket didn't help that much either, so I ended up very blessed when I landed at mine, though it did take a lot longer than I would have liked...
 
Last edited:
#50
Oh, near League City? I used to live out in Pearland years ago; the family still has friends in Southwest Houston. We used to go to Sagemont off of 45 and the Sam Houston tollway, though that might be a bit of a drive for you. It's also pretty big, though extraordinary inviting (not an exaggeration in the slightest, it's crazy how homey it feels despite being a megachurch. Visited it a few months ago and it hasn't changed in the slightest besides the building getting bigger) and are really good about getting people plugged into community.

I'm in Austin these days though, and most of my Houston trips are on the west side these days. That being said I know for sure that there's some solid churches in your area.
I grew up in League City. Went to Clear Creek High School. I actually live in Kemah now, which is basically touching South Shore.

Greatly appreciate the suggestions. Very cool to hear my big little city acknowledged online!
 
Top