The PC Builders Thread ("I Need a New PC") v2

#1


Welcome to the PC Builders Thread, where we talk about computer hardware! Novices and experts alike are welcome. Whether you're upgrading your existing computer, want to build a new one, have a question, or just like talking about computers in general - we've got you covered!


September 27th: The RTX 2080 Ti will release.
October 17th: The RTX 2070 will release.
October-November 2018: Intel's Core 9000-series CPUs, including the 8C/8T 9700k and 8C/16T 9900k processors, are rumored to be released.
Late October 2018: Cooler Master is readying a new edition of the venerable Hyper 212-line of CPU coolers.
2H 2019: AMD's Ryzen 3000-series CPUs, on 7nm technology (from 12nm), are roughly estimated to be released.


September 20th, 2018: Nvidia's RTX 2080 GPU is released.
August 31st, 2018: AMD's 16-core, 32-thread Threadripper 2950X processor releases at an MSRP of $899.
August 15th, 2018: SSD prices are expected to drop significantly into 2019 due to oversupply.


CPU-Z - displays processor, motherboard, and memory information
GPU-Z - displays information about your videocard
CoreTemp - a program for monitoring processor temperatures
EVGA Precision XOC - useful for overclocking your videocard, monitoring temps, setting a custom fan curve, etc.
MSI Afterburner - useful for overclocking your videocard, monitoring temps, setting a custom fan curve, etc.
AMD Ryzen Master - for Ryzen and Threadripper systems, monitoring and system performance adjustments
HWiNFO - detailed system information and monitoring
BlueScreenView - provides info about BSODs
ProduKey - provides your CD/Serial Key for Windows and Microsoft Office; useful to recover keys from back-up drives
Macrium Reflect - easy cloning of one SSD/HDD to another SSD/HDD


Cinebench - CPU Benchmark
Blender Benchmark - CPU Benchmark
SuperPi Mod 1.5 - CPU Benchmark (Single-threaded)
Unigine Heaven - Graphics Benchmark
Unigine Superposition - Graphics Benchmark
3DMark - Graphics Benchmark (Click "Download Demo")
FF XIV Stormblood Benchmark - Graphics Benchmark
CrystalDiskMark - HDD / SSD Storage Benchmark
UserBenchmark - All-around benchmark, comparing your components to other’s same components (note, if others overclocked their specific component and you did not, it’s likely yours will fall below the average, so don’t necessarily panic!)


Asus RealBench - CPU/GPU/Memory/Storage (Click "Download RealBench")
Prime95 - CPU (Warning, Prime95 can make your system run very hot, keep a close eye on temps)
OCCT - CPU/GPU/PSU
MemTest86 - Memory


Amazon
Newegg
Ebay
Microcenter - Also has brick and mortar stores
Fry's Electronics - Also has brick and mortar stores
PCPartPicker - NOT a store, but a price aggregator; select your region/country in the top-right


Educational
Overclock.net
JohnnyGuru
Anandtech
GamersNexus (YouTube)
Gear Seekers (YouTube)
Actually Hardcore Overclocking (YouTube)
Louis Rossmann (YouTube)
Hardware Unboxed (YouTube)
Nerd on a Budget (YouTube)

Entertaining
Hardware Canucks (YouTube)
JP Modified (YouTube)
JayzTwoCents (YouTube)
Linus Tech Tips (YouTube)


Answering these questions will help us recommend or put together a build for you:

1) What's your budget?
2) What do you want to use the computer for?
3) How soon do you plan to purchase the parts and build it?
4) Are you going to reuse any parts (upgrading) or are you building a completely new computer from scratch?
5) Do you only need the computer itself or do you need accessories, such as a monitor, mouse, keyboard, and speakers?
6) Are you interested in overclocking? (Overclocking is running components such as the processor or videocard at a higher speed than they come from the factory. It can give additional performance but can come with consequences such as increased heat (requiring better cooling), higher power consumption, possibly more noise, and stress testing to ensure that the overclock is stable.)


These builds are example/starting-points at a variety of price ranges; please note that prices below are subject to change:

[AMD] Entry-Level iGPU Quad-Core, $530
[Intel] Entry-Level Dual-Core, $570
[AMD] Entry-Level Quad-Core, $695
[Intel] Entry-Level Quad-Core, $725
[AMD] Mid-Range/Balanced Build, $875
[AMD] Upper-Mid Tier, $1035
[Intel] Upper-Mid Tier, $1080
[AMD] Octa-Core First-Level, $1300
[AMD] Octa-Core Second-Level, $1415
[AMD] High-End Gaming, $1685
[Intel] High-End Gaming, $1750
[AMD] The "Money Is No Object" Build, $2400
[Intel] The "Money Is No Object" Build, $2450

[AMD] HEDT Build, $3,925 (For video editing, rendering, and professional use - not a primary gaming rig)


Processor (CPU) - Think of this as the brain of your computer. It's responsible for processing all of the instructions necessary to make your computer do things. Modern CPUs have multiple cores (multiple processors on a single chip) and whether you need more cores or faster cores depends on what type of tasks you'll need the CPU to execute.

Memory (RAM) - When programs need to be executed, they get loaded into memory so that they can then be processed by the processor. This memory is volatile or non-persistent, meaning that the data stored here will be lost when you turn off your computer.

Motherboard - Think of this as the heart of your computer. Everything in your computer plugs into this and it's basically responsible for allowing all of the components (like the CPU and videocard, for example) to communicate with each other.

Videocard - This is responsible for rendering everything that you seen on your computer screen. A videocard contains both the GPU (graphics processing unit) and VRAM (video RAM, used just by the GPU and not the rest of the system).

Storage - This is the place where data is stored on your computer long term. If you turn off the computer then the data is persisted and will still be there the next time you turn it on. The two most popular types of storage are HDDs (hard disk drives) and SSDs (solid state drives). HDDs are an older technology, have internal moving parts, and are slower, yet are cheaper per gigabyte. SSDs are a newer technology that have no moving parts, are faster and quieter, but are also more expensive per gigabyte. The two most popular types of SSDs are 2.5” SATA-based SSDs (connects to the motherboard via a SATA data cable and a SATA power cable) and M.2 SSDs (newer, plugs directly into the motherboard with no cables required). M.2 SSDs have two sub-types:SATA and NVME. SATA-based M.2 drives operate at essentially the same speed as SATA-based 2.5” SSDs, but NVME-based M.2 drives can operate at roughly 3-10x faster than SATA-based 2.5” SSDs.

Case - This is the chassis that houses your computer. There are a wide variety of case types for a wide variety of purposes and preferences. Some people like small cases that fit anywhere, silent cases that mask or reduce fan noise, large cases that can fit a lot of components, fancy cases with RGB lighting or very nice looks, etc.

Power Supply (PSU) - This is the part that is responsible for providing power to the components inside your computer. You should look at the overall wattage to make sure that it can provide enough power for your system as well as other features like the efficiency rating (how well the PSU converts the AC power it receives from the outlet to DC power the components of the PC can use), modularity (whether cables not needed can be disconnected from the PSU), the fan (whether it turns off under no load or turns slowly under light loads to reduce noise), how many amps each of the rails provides, etc.

Optical Drive - If you want to use optical media on your computer such as a CD-ROM, a DVD, or a Blu-ray then you'll want one of these. You can either go for an internal drive or an external drive. An internal drive is inside the computer and right there whenever you may need it, but an external drive can be put away when you don't need it and can easily be used among several computers if necessary since it's easy to disconnect and reconnect.

Sound Card - Most modern motherboards come with internal sound components already which allow you to hear sound from your computer. However, there are also standalone internal sound cards or even external DACs and amps that you can buy if you want even higher quality sound or specific features.

Cooling - This includes case fans, the fan & heatsink on your processor, and the fan & heatsink on your videocard. Normally when you buy a case it comes with a few fans, but more fans can be added to improve cooling or the stock fans can be replaced with different fans depending on if you want different colors, different speeds / noise, or even just higher quality and longer-lasting fans. For CPU cooling you can either go with air cooling (which involves a metal heatsink on the processor and most likely one or more fans to blow air across the heatsink fins), AIO (all-in-one) water cooling (which includes a water-block, pump, reservoir, and tubing all in one unit designed for ease of use), custom water cooling (where you buy the water cooling components separately in order to customize it and achieve even better performance and/or lower noise), or exotic cooling (like phase change, dry ice, or liquid nitrogen used for hardcore benchmarking). Videocards come with either air cooling or AIO water cooling, but they can also be switched over to custom water cooling and some come with a custom water-block pre-installed and ready for your custom water cooling loop. Exotic cooling is also possible for videocards but again is only for hardcore benchmarkers.

PCI Express Cards - These are add-in cards that can populate your motherboard's PCI Express slots in order to add more functionality. An add-in sound card or WiFi PCI Express adapter are examples.

Accessories/Peripherals - Other accessories can also exist inside a computer such as mice, keyboards, RGB lighting strips, mouse pads, mouse bungees, etc.


How to assemble a computer (YouTube)
How to assemble a computer (Article)
Explanation of hyper-threading (YouTube; also applies to AMD's simultaneous multi-threading (SMT)
Computer acronym list (Article)
Introduction to custom water cooling (YouTube)
Small form-factor (SFF) case list (Google Sheet)

If you have any questions then feel free to ask us!​
 
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#2


August 12th, 2018: Celcius and Haz did amazing work putting together and maintaining the Version 1 thread, but Celcius has become too busy to maintain it, so he is passing the torch to me! Let me know if you have any suggested changes.
 
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#3
I'm looking for a new case for my htpc. The one I have now is too big. It needs to be able to fit a full size GPU and power supply. I have a microatx motherboard. Also I'd like to keep my DVD drive.
 
#4
How are GPU and RAM prices generally looking at the moment? Doom Eternal's gameplay reveal revived my interest in replacing my Sandy Bridge-based rig from 2011 (albeit with a 970 and a few other additions)
 
#6
I'm looking for advice, I want to build a new PC with a GTX1080 or the upcoming 1180 and I don't know if I should reuse some parts (e.g. CPU, mainboard) or just sell them.

Specs:
CPU: Intel i7 – 7700 3,6 GHz
Mainoard: ASUS Pro Gaming B150
RAM: 2x8GB 3200MHz DDR4
GPU: R9 279x 4GB
Straight Power E9 700W
 
#7
I'm looking for advice, I want to build a new PC with a GTX1080 or the upcoming 1180 and I don't know if I should reuse some parts (e.g. CPU, mainboard) or just sell them.

Specs:
CPU: Intel i7 – 7700 3,6 GHz
Mainoard: ASUS Pro Gaming B150
RAM: 2x8GB 3200MHz DDR4
GPU: R9 279x 4GB
Straight Power E9 700W
You can basically reuse everything and just drop in a new GPU. I7 7700 is still a great gaming chip. If you don’t have an SSD you need one (but I’m guessing you do from the specs)

The new 8700 is better for number crunchers but for gaming it’s not a big jump for most stuff. Check these benchmarks:


These were run at 1080p, so that’s the most difference you will probably see in real-world games. If you run at a higher resolution like 1440p or 4K you would see even less difference in most games, because the GPU would be more of the bottleneck than the CPU.
 
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#8
I know it's impossible to future proof but how long will my Ryzen 5 1600, 16gb ram, 1060 6gb comp be relevant? The i3 I've been using for 5 years still chugs along but started showing its age at year 2.
 
#9
What's the likelihood of a Xeon E3-1231 v3 (3.4 ghz) bottlenecking a 1080?

My R9 380 is feeling long in the tooth in both FFXV and MHW, and I'd like to make sure my CPU can handle the additional workload before I upgrade my GPU.

Is there an easy way to calculate this sort of thing? Plan on playing in 1440p.
 
#10
I've been eyeing the Louqe Ghost S1 case for what feels like a year, now... waiting to build.

http://www.louqe.com/



Shipments got delayed again. At this point, I hope to be able to snag one by late October, which should be a great time for a new build. My last machine has lasted me forever - a 3820/16GB/768GB/Titan monster in 2013 that is still kicking ass with only a GPU upgrade to a 1080. But, that CPU is getting real long in the tooth, and no longer overclocks past its stock clock which is sub-4ghz.

I've been on water for ages. Full custom loop with 7x120mm rads. Before that I had HUGE CPU air coolers. The only thing I'm worried about with the case above is noise. I can deal with heat. But I don't want it to sound like a jet engine - and I just don't think that's avoidable. I know they sell top-hats, but I'm kinda meh on what it does to the look.
 
#11
What's the likelihood of a Xeon E3-1231 v3 (3.4 ghz) bottlenecking a 1080?

My R9 380 is feeling long in the tooth in both FFXV and MHW, and I'd like to make sure my CPU can handle the additional workload before I upgrade my GPU.

Is there an easy way to calculate this sort of thing? Plan on playing in 1440p.
It may be hard to find good gaming benchmarks on Xeons, but if you have someplace local with a good return policy, you could always get the card there and then if it isn’t a good fit you could just return it.

Here are a couple vids I found of that CPU paired with a 1080 if that helps:


 
#12
Does anyone have any recommendations for a rack-mountable style case?

I recently upgraded my work desk to a Studio RTA Producer Station Desk and have been looking to replace my HTPC SilverStone Grandia GD08 which doesn't fit my MSI RX480 8GB (top of the case can't be closed due to GPU height).

The desk supports standard rack-mountable equipment; but most cases I've found are server focused. I've tried a Rosewell RSVR-R4100-4U case but way the internal case was organized didn't allow a full-sized GPU. I'm using an ASUS Maximus IV Gene-Z mATX motherboard.

Does anyone have a recommendation rack-mountable PC Case (4U-6U) that supports full sized GPUs?
 
#13
have the funds ready to build my new gaming pc
but gonna wait to see what Nvidia announce at gamescom, and this will hopefully push the price of a gtx 1080 down
 
#14
Celcius did amazing work putting together and maintaining the Version 1 thread, but he has become too busy to maintain it, so he is passing the torch to me! Let me know if you have any suggested changes.

RESERVED
How about a suggested/recommend products list? We had this on the thread on GAF remember myself and some people recommending products but it was never updated at all.

Oh and what are some flaws and strengths of different types of products like Air vs AIO cooling, Blower vs dual fan graphics cards, etc
 
#15
How about a suggested/recommend products list? We had this on the thread on GAF remember myself and some people recommending products but it was never updated at all.

Oh and what are some flaws and strengths of different types of products like Air vs AIO cooling, Blower vs dual fan graphics cards, etc
We already have 13? or so suggested builds from $500-$2,300, and each build has a write-up explaining the picks. Did you mean something else?

Descriptions of different types of products (blower vs dusl fan GPUs for example) is a good idea. I'll work on it! Adding a News section soon, too, to mark major product releases etc.
 
#16
thanks for your earlier reply to my post Soda (2700X vs 1800X).
think I'll sell the 1800X I just bought and see if I can find 2700X.

I already have a Noctua DH15 though... and I'll be using it on Asrock X370 Taichi with G.Skill Flare X 2x8GB (DDR4 3200).

seems like the 2700X would be a better match-up?
 
#17
I've slowly started to collect parts for my new build (my 2500K is extremely long in the tooth at this point), but I had a couple of questions for you smart folks:

What should I look for in a good case? If anyone has any recommendations in mind I'd appreciate those too. I do video editing stuff as a hobby so preferably something with a good number of hard drive bays, I'm going to go with an ATX motherboard (w/ a full size graphics card and probably a Noctuna air cooler), and I don't want something with a billion LEDs because I don't like how it looks.

Any thoughts about putting a NAS drive in for video file storage? From what I've read, it sounds like putting those in a PC tower negates the anti-vibration benefit those drives have, but I like the idea of having a giant amount of storage in one drive.

Any good guides for air cooling? Water cooling seems like a pain (having to change the fluid every so often sounds... annoying), and from what I've read the Nocutuna's do pretty well. However, I don't know jack about fan placement, optimal air pressure, etc.
 
#19
I'm looking for a new case for my htpc. The one I have now is too big. It needs to be able to fit a full size GPU and power supply. I have a microatx motherboard. Also I'd like to keep my DVD drive.
I'm not sure you have many options here. Many newer cases drop external drive bays and that seems particularly true for small form factor cases. SilverStone's Grandia series is one option.
 
#20
This is so tempting: https://www.bestbuy.com/site/dell-27-led-qhd-gsync-monitor-black/5293502.p?skuId=5293502

It's just about the most appealing valued GSync monitor I've seen yet. Because it has almost everything else I want: 27", 1440p resolution, 144 Hz, 1ms response. But it a TN panel, which is just fine by my standards.

Been waiting for these GSync monitors to come down in price. I don't even need anything bigger than a 24" or a 27", and 4K monitors are still too expensive, and don't often go above 60hz.
 
#21
Prices in Canada appear to be dropping for just about everything which is damn nice, we still pay way too much, usually a good amount more than our southern neighbor.
 
#23
Hi guys - I’m trying to build my first PC, a very simple WoW, Civ 6 and potentially Fortnite machine. I’ve been toying around with something like this:

https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/B4Nytg

Just wanted to get any comments/ suggestions. I’m probably going to put in a basic graphics card down the line as well.
The immediate thing I saw is that I would definitely go with a fully-modular power supply like this one. It is easier to work with, won't restrict airflow as much, and looks better. Definitely worth the $10-$15 more. The model I linked is 450W compared to the 600W one you have in your list, but 450W is plenty of power even if you threw in an RX 480 or GTX 1060 in the future. I'm from the US, so I don't really look at Canadian deals, but I feel like you can get a pretty good fully-modular, Bronze+ rated PSU with a higher total wattage rating for a nice price if you keep looking.
 
#24
The immediate thing I saw is that I would definitely go with a fully-modular power supply like this one. It is easier to work with, won't restrict airflow as much, and looks better. Definitely worth the $10-$15 more. The model I linked is 450W compared to the 600W one you have in your list, but 450W is plenty of power even if you threw in an RX 480 or GTX 1060 in the future. I'm from the US, so I don't really look at Canadian deals, but I feel like you can get a pretty good fully-modular, Bronze+ rated PSU with a higher total wattage rating for a nice price if you keep looking.
Thanks!

Another goal is to have something I can build on in the future, from that perspective would anyone recommend spending more on any of my current selections?
 
#26
I just wanted to share my first build here. I began purchasing parts starting with the CPU and Mother board (I should've planned to OC but oh well) back in April. Over the course of 3 months I just kept looking out for good sales through Frys ad in my email, Reddit PCbuildsales and Newegg.
All the parts were bought from different stores like Microcenter in Tustin, CA. Best Buy, Frys, Newegg, Amazon. in the end I did save a good $200 vs just buying all the parts outright based on PCpartspicker pricing. Using google, YouTube and the motherboard manul I was able to put the pc together myself with no experience. I know my cable management isn't the best but here is the result of what I was able to put together.

https://flic.kr/p/27hkiw7

(any help on how to add an image? )

i7-8700
Asus Prime 370 -A mother board
Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB RAM 3200
NZXT Kraken 62
MSI GTX 1070 Ti Gaming GPU (best deal from Frys via pricing error in ad)
NZXT Elite black matte Case
 
#28
Very happy to see this thread as my current PC was built using an older iteration. I'm looking to upgrade my CPU/MB with some DDR4 this fall and gift this to my brother studying programming.

Bro Build:

CPU: I7-4790K
MBU: Gigabyte Z97-UD3H
FAN: Hyper 212 EVO
RAM: Adata XPG 16GB DDR3 1600 PC3
HDD: 256GB Western Digital M.2
GPU: ZOTAC NVIDIA GeForce GTX 760 2GB GDDR5
PWR: EVGA 500 BR
CASE: Corsair 275R

Will have the following to work with:

GPU: MSI Gaming X 1070 [May Upgrade]
HDD: 500GB Crucial SSD + 2x 2TB WD Drives
PWR: Corsair TX Series TX650M 650W
CASE: Phanteks Enthoo Pro M SE [Considering downsizing]
 
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#29
thanks for your earlier reply to my post Soda (2700X vs 1800X).
think I'll sell the 1800X I just bought and see if I can find 2700X.

I already have a Noctua DH15 though... and I'll be using it on Asrock X370 Taichi with G.Skill Flare X 2x8GB (DDR4 3200).

seems like the 2700X would be a better match-up?
Personally, I don't think exchanging an 1800X for a 2700X is worth the trouble. Depends on your usage I guess. Unless you find a crazy good deal on the 2700X, I'd just wait for the 3700 to release, which I expect (based on just my thoughts and no real evidence) to launch by May 2019. It'll be on 7nm tech instead of 12nm and we'll likely see a pretty significant jump in IPC/clock speed.

Earlier, I thought you were looking to buy one or the other, in which case spending a bit more for the 2700x seemed reasonable... But having to remove and resell the 1800x just doesn't sound that appealing to me, personally, and I wouldn't put the effort into it myself is all.
 
#31
We already have 13? or so suggested builds from $500-$2,300, and each build has a write-up explaining the picks. Did you mean something else?
Kinda? Just recommending specific parts.
Like for example the Thermalright TrueSpirit 140, Scythe Fuma, and Scythe Mugen 5 are all amazing air coolers that can compete with $80 air coolers.
Also for SSDs, the Adata XPG line are defnitely worth looking into as they're great cheap SSDs that I'm pretty sure are NVMe, specifically their SX8200 line.

The Octocore Second Level build is just something I disagree with a lot. Even though they're explaining why they chose the parts, better options are available, they aren't picked.
Edit: Just noticed they went from a 2TB Toshiba drive to a more expensive 2TB Seagate drive because it's a "reputable brand" despite Toshiba drives being Hitachi/HGST rebrands and are incredibly reliable. You can easily a good 3TB for under $80.
 
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#32
Gosh, that's really a shame about CaseLabs going out of business. Their cases were amazing looking! I was all set to buy one for my next build, but then they had to raise their prices 20% because of the tariffs. At that point I really couldn't justify it anymore over a $50 Fractal Design case. I feel bad now, but I guess if I did order one back in July I would have lost money to the bankruptcy stuff.
 
#33
Hi guys - I’m trying to build my first PC, a very simple WoW, Civ 6 and potentially Fortnite machine. I’ve been toying around with something like this:

https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/B4Nytg

Just wanted to get any comments/ suggestions. I’m probably going to put in a basic graphics card down the line as well.
As long as you don’t max WoW you should be fine. Overclocked it looks like the 2200 can hold 50-60fps during raids.
 
#35
Hey new thread. I'm aiming to build a new pc sometime in fall. I haven't been keeping with the latest news in pc world, but I've made my to go (back) with AMD again with a Ryzen 2700X system

--------
On another note, anyone ever run into issue where the GeForce driver uninstaller is missing from the programs and features in Windows 10? This is new — I've never encountered this before.

I have a GTX 1060 on 391.35 drivers. It works fine, games work fine. I go to uninstall the drivers (to update) and driver uninstaller is missing. Physx and Nvidia audio driver(I don't recall installing this) are there though. Some help would be appreciated, thanks.
 
#36
I've added a Hardware News section at the top of the OP for anyone that wants to keep up on quick summaries of major releases. I'll add expected/rumored release dates for major releases, too, once I get a bit more time (Nvidia's GPUs would be the biggest upcoming releases).

Kinda? Just recommending specific parts.
Like for example the Thermalright TrueSpirit 140, Scythe Fuma, and Scythe Mugen 5 are all amazing air coolers that can compete with $80 air coolers.
Also for SSDs, the Adata XPG line are defnitely worth looking into as they're great cheap SSDs that I'm pretty sure are NVMe, specifically their SX8200 line.

The Octocore Second Level build is just something I disagree with a lot. Even though they're explaining why they chose the parts, better options are available, they aren't picked.
Edit: Just noticed they went from a 2TB Toshiba drive to a more expensive 2TB Seagate drive because it's a "reputable brand" despite Toshiba drives being Hitachi/HGST rebrands and are incredibly reliable. You can easily a good 3TB for under $80.
I honestly like the idea of a comprehensive list of parts that are high-quality/reliable, but that's beyond my available free-time to generate. If someone wants to put it together and keep it updated, I'd be happy to integrate it into the main post. For something that large, we'd probably want it as a Google Doc/Sheet, otherwise, it might not fit well (if at all). I agree that all the CPU coolers you mentioned are solid as are Adata XPG SSDs.

I went ahead and swapped the Seagate drive back to the Toshiba drive (~$10 cheaper) and removed the "reputable brand" word-choice. I agree with your suggestion on that change. In general, the "Suggested Builds" were meant to be examples, not unchangeable lists. So, with that in mind, I changed the header from "Suggested" to "Example" builds to hopefully clarify that. Honestly, I'd love to have someone go through each example build and tear them apart, as I've essentially done the best I could (with help from Celcius and a few posts from people here occasionally offering suggested changes) to put together useful examples, but I'm always happy to make them better and better.

Hey new thread. I'm aiming to build a new pc sometime in fall. I haven't been keeping with the latest news in pc world, but I've made my to go (back) with AMD again with a Ryzen 2700X system

--------
On another note, anyone ever run into issue where the GeForce driver uninstaller is missing from the programs and features in Windows 10? This is new — I've never encountered this before.

I have a GTX 1060 on 391.35 drivers. It works fine, games work fine. I go to uninstall the drivers (to update) and driver uninstaller is missing. Physx and Nvidia audio driver(I don't recall installing this) are there though. Some help would be appreciated, thanks.
Can you do a clean install through the GeForce Experience updater, rather than uninstalling and then installing through GeForce Experience? I suspect the end result will be relatively similar. But, I'm on the 398.82 Graphics Drivers for my 1080 Ti and I see it (plus the other ~4 Nvidia drivers) as visible in the Apps & Features section of W10. Not sure why yours aren't there...
 
#37
Personally, I don't think exchanging an 1800X for a 2700X is worth the trouble. Depends on your usage I guess. Unless you find a crazy good deal on the 2700X, I'd just wait for the 3700 to release, which I expect (based on just my thoughts and no real evidence) to launch by May 2019. It'll be on 7nm tech instead of 12nm and we'll likely see a pretty significant jump in IPC/clock speed.

Earlier, I thought you were looking to buy one or the other, in which case spending a bit more for the 2700x seemed reasonable... But having to remove and resell the 1800x just doesn't sound that appealing to me, personally, and I wouldn't put the effort into it myself is all.
I have a whole story behind it... (bought the 1800X from Newegg... so it's on its way to me... so it's not installed or anything like that)
at this rate my rig will never get built :/

and my X370 Taichi will get increasingly irrelevant? :/

(and how do I port over my W10 without signing on to a Microsoft account - my W10 is a free upgrade from a W8 installation)
 
#38
I have a whole story behind it... (bought the 1800X from Newegg... so it's on its way to me... so it's not installed or anything like that)
at this rate my rig will never get built :/

and my X370 Taichi will get increasingly irrelevant? :/

(and how do I port over my W10 without signing on to a Microsoft account - my W10 is a free upgrade from a W8 installation)
The only way I know of to port W10 without signing into a Microsoft account is to call Microsoft directly, but that's not guaranteed. I had a free upgrade and it worked for me after 1) syncing it to my MS account and 2) going through a long phone call (two calls, actually). But, I think the free upgrades aren't guaranteed to be port-able... Why not make a MS account? I'm by no means an expert on porting W10 though, so I'd recommend you get a second opinion.

Also, the X370 will run AMD's CPUs through 2019 and probably 2020. So, technically yes it could become more outdated, but it'll still work on newer CPUs even a few years from now, which means it should hold decent value for you personally and also decent resale value. Heck, the X370 Taichi still sells for something like $160 brand new. It's not garbage or obsolete by any means.

I'm just saying, if you're anxious to build and have a definite need for the parts, I don't think you should feel bad at all about building an 1800x + X370 rig. On stock settings, you've got an 8C/16T CPU that can boost to 4 GHz. The price of an 8C/16T CPU was ridiculously higher just 1.5 years ago. Anyway, I'm not trying to talk you into the 1800x over the 2700x, just saying that, either way, you're getting a solid CPU that you can be happy with, IMO.
 
#39
Looking for a mini itx case. Focusing on small size but needs to fit a discrete gpu. It can be a half width 2 slot if need be.

I've been planning on getting the fractal node 202, and I might -- but I feel like it's still needlessly big. There are some cool boutique cases but I'm not trying to spend $300 on a case.
Anything else out there?
 
#40
Can you do a clean install through the GeForce Experience updater, rather than uninstalling and then installing through GeForce Experience? I suspect the end result will be relatively similar. But, I'm on the 398.82 Graphics Drivers for my 1080 Ti and I see it (plus the other ~4 Nvidia drivers) as visible in the Apps & Features section of W10. Not sure why yours aren't there...
I don't have GeForce experience. The only other thing I always install with drivers is Physx. So I'm not sure why the driver uninstall is not showing in Programs and features like it supposed to. Really strange.
 
#41
Looking for a mini itx case. Focusing on small size but needs to fit a discrete gpu. It can be a half width 2 slot if need be.

I've been planning on getting the fractal node 202, and I might -- but I feel like it's still needlessly big. There are some cool boutique cases but I'm not trying to spend $300 on a case.
Anything else out there?
The ones now sold through SFF LAB? Yeah pretty expensive considering that they come pretty bare bones (pcie risers are extra?) while things like the InWin A1 comes with a power supply. But Products made in small volumes can't compete in price with mainstream brands.
Dr. Zaber are doing a new version of their case, but who knows when that will be available.
 
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#42
My computer has been slow lately... I think it might be my hard drives?

I ran some speed tests and this is what I get:

SSD:
Sequential Read (Q= 32,T= 1) : 555.657 MB/s
Sequential Write (Q= 32,T= 1) : 310.909 MB/s

HDD:
Sequential Read (Q= 32,T= 1) : 146.119 MB/s
Sequential Write (Q= 32,T= 1) : 142.804 MB/s

Anyone see a problem here? or do the speeds look ok?
 
#43
As far as prebuying stuff before the announcement? of new cards/cpus? Other than a case and OS anything else worth grabbing early? I guess Ram is more or less safe if you can find a good deal.
 
#44
New thread nice.

Ugh...didn't know newegg doesn't ship on weekends...was really hoping my stuff arrives just in time for battle for Azeroth. Looks like gonna have to wait an extra day.
 
#46
Hi guys - I’m trying to build my first PC, a very simple WoW, Civ 6 and potentially Fortnite machine. I’ve been toying around with something like this:

https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/B4Nytg

Just wanted to get any comments/ suggestions. I’m probably going to put in a basic graphics card down the line as well.
Note that the motherboard has no HDMI or Display Port so it can be tricky if you want to run a FreeSync monitor. Should be fine for a regular 1080p monitor. Monitors higher than 1080p will require DisplayPort (and struggle with this chip unless you lower the game's resolution). This will not matter once you grab a video card.

Also, no onboard Wifi or Bluetooth on mATX AM4 motherboards so you will have to purchase a WiFi card (most pci cards feature Bluetooth) or use Ethernet.

You must use 2 sticks of DDR4-3000 or DDR4-3200 ram to get decent frame rates out of a 2200g. Ryzen APUs run way slower on single channel ram. Check youtube for examples. That will only cost about $15 more but will be well worth it.

[edit] One more thing. If you really want to push this card, and it pushes very well, you will require an AM4 compatible CPU cooler. The stock cooler works fine for mild CPU+GPU overclocks but you need decent cooling to really push it.
 
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#47
My computer has been slow lately... I think it might be my hard drives?

I ran some speed tests and this is what I get:

SSD:
Sequential Read (Q= 32,T= 1) : 555.657 MB/s
Sequential Write (Q= 32,T= 1) : 310.909 MB/s

HDD:
Sequential Read (Q= 32,T= 1) : 146.119 MB/s
Sequential Write (Q= 32,T= 1) : 142.804 MB/s

Anyone see a problem here? or do the speeds look ok?
I believe 550 MB/s and 520 MB/s are essentially max for read/write (respectively) for a SATA III SSD, so that seems about right if my memory serves.
 
#48
The ones now sold through SFF LAB? Yeah pretty expensive considering that they come pretty bare bones (pcie risers are extra?) while things like the InWin A1 comes with a power supply. But Products made in small volumes can't compete in price with mainstream brands.
Dr. Zaber are doing a new version of their case, but who knows when that will be available.
Damn. That Dr Zaber case is exactly what I'm looking for. I imagine it will be out of my price range though unfortunately.
 
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